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Full text of "Catalogue of the First District State Normal School, Kirksville, Missouri"

REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



3 1833 02885 5556 



i 6c 929-11 M6954m 
F S rst D i st r i c t No r ma 1 Sc h oo 1 

(Ki rksvi He, Mo. ) 
Catalogue of the First 
District State Normal 



I 



CATALOGUE 



\ 




FIRST DISTRICT 



State Normal School 




^CIRksVlLLE, MISSOURI. _J| 



1 900- 1 90 1 



fCo«BB PRt'.TiNO Company^ 
St*. Joseph,- Mo.- * %l 



BOARD OF REGENTS. 



REGENT EX-OFFICIO. 

RON. w/t. CARRINGTON. 

......State Superintendent of Public Schools, Jefferson City 

REGENTS APPOINTED. 



SCOTT J. MILLER Chillicothe 

C. O.fFOGLE Lancaster 

J. vk MARTIN .Kirksville 

GEORGE HALL.. .Trenton 

" S. M. PICKLER .Kirksville 

/ A. W. MULLINS Linneus 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

" SCOTT J. MILLER .President 

GEORGE HALL Vice-President 

J. W. MARTIN. Secretary 

R. M. RINGO. .... Treasurer 



y STANDING COMMITTEES. 
Executive t % Hall, Fogle and Pickler. 

Teaciiees, Text Books, Course of Study, Catalogue and 
Library: Carrington, Mullins, Martin. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/catalogueoffirstOOfirs 



FACULTY, 1900-1901. 



JOHN It. KIRK, President. .... Pedagogics. 
OPHELIA A. PARRISH, A. B. . , Supervisor of Training School 

and Assistant in Pedagogics. 

B, P. GENTRY Latin. 

E. M. VIOLETTE, A. B., A. M. . . History. 

.TNO. T. VAUGHN, B. .S Civics. 

J. E. WEATHERLY, B. S Physical Science. 

L. S. DOUGHERTY, M. S. . . , . . . Biology. 

CARRIE RUTH JACKSON. , '. , . . Assistant in Biology; Teacher 

of Agriculture. 

A. P, SETTLE, B. L. English. 

HALLIE HALL, Ph. B., A. M. .. Assistant in English. 

H. CLAY HARVEY, A. B Mathematics. 

MARY T. PRE WITT, M. S. D Assistant in Mathematics. 

ERMINE OWEN.... ...Reading and Physical Culture. 

M. WINNIFRED BRYAN ...Manual Training and Domestic 

<: , Art. 

FRANCES TINKHAM. Vocal Music. 

, Drawing. 



irRKSVTLLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



5 



PEDAGOGICS. 

IN CHARGE OF THE PRESIDENT. 

The effort is made to present school management and meth- 
ods of teaching from the view point of the concrete and practi- 
cal. Our pedagogical library is fairly well supplied with the re- 
ports, catalogues and courses of study of all the important public 
schools, academies, seminaries and colleges in the State; also an 
abundance of school laws, institute circulars and other state doc- 
uments. Students are lirst of all made as familiar as possible 
with the gradation and organization of a typical elementary school 
as exemplified by the Training School Department of the Institu- 
tion. The classification of educational institutions into elemen- 
tary, secondary and higher is made as clear as possible. Then 
the details of actual school organization and gradation are taken 
up one by one and the reasons discovered why schools exist as 
they are and why the attempt is made to organize them as they 
are being organized. The public school course of study is exam- 
ined in detail. Each student makes out for inspection and criti- 
cism a daily program for a public school basing this program on 
the course of study and the needs of those children likely to be . 
found in the respective classes of a typical public school. 

While our students are familiarizing themselves with the 
nomenclature and principal characteristics of our school system 
no effort is made to follow any specific text book on School Econ- 
omy. The students are nevertheless, most of them, in possession 
of one or more books of their own on School Management and 
Pedagogy to which they refer from day to day. School laws, 
catalogues, reports and pamphlets are from time to time handed 
out to the students and directions given as to preparation on 
specific topics for recitation and discussion. It will therefore 
be seen that we are attempting to introduce our students to actual 
professional life in the most practical way possible. 

During the Junior Year one semester is devoted to the study 
of Psychology. In this subject students are expected to have one 
or more text books of their own. The class of the past year used 
Halleck's "Psychology and Psychic Culture;" but even when 
the students are supplied with text books of their own we find 
them almost daily culling our pedagogical library for such works 
as will throw light on the subject matter of the text and for 
authorities from which to gain supplementary reading matter 
while preparing special subjects assigned for investigation. 



6 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



The Senior Class have one semester in History of Education. 
During the past year no attempt was made to follow any single 
.text book. At the beginning of the semester the teacher of the 
class consumed several recitation periods exhibiting and describ- 
ing to the class some of the most attractive volumes in the peda- 
gogical library of the department. Among the volumes thus de- 
scribed for the purpose of exciting interest and curiosity the fol- 
lowing may be mentioned by way of illustration: 

"Talks on Psychology and Life's Ideals," James; "The Study 
of Children," Warner; "Horace Mann," Hinsdale; "Educational 
lief orin," Elliott; "History of Pedagogy," Hailman; "Education of 
the Central Nervous System," Halleck; "Animal Intelligence," 
Romanes; "Human and Animal Psychology," Wundt; "Psychol- 
ogy and Life," Munsterberg; "Education of the Greek People," 
Davidson; "Talks on Pedagogics," Parker; "The School System of 
Ontario," Ross; Rousseau's "Einile;" "Pestalozzi's Life and Work," 
De Guimp; "Educational Reformers," Quick; "History of Educa- 
tion," Painter; "Art Education," The J. C. Witter Co.; "School 
Sanitation and Decoration," Burrage and Bailey; and some other 
readable books and magazines. 

Immediately after this series of talks students were given 
access to the library and without very much specific direction 
they were authorized to select their own subjects and authorities. 
After some two weeks of reading and study they presented 
in the class reviews or papers embodying their ideas of the sub- 
jects studied by them. While the class as stated was known 
as a class in the History of Education it will be seen from the 
varying subjects • selected by them, to be studied and presented 
in class by them, that the formal and connected history of edu- 
cation did not interest them very much. Perhaps some will say 
that a class of Seniors in a Normal School should be dealt with 
more rigidly and systematically; but it was the impression of the 
teacher and of the class (intelligent people averaging 24 years 
of age) that our plan was incomparably more interesting and 
profitable than it would have been to follow any series of lessons 
in a text book. Guided largely by their own judgment from one 
to three members of the class presented papers or reviews on 
each of the following subjects: 

"Spartan Education;" "Grecian Education;" "Emile;" "Froe- 
bel;" "Pestalozzi;" "The Laboratory in Education;" "The Influ- 
ence of the Crusades in Education;" "The Jesuits and their Influ- 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



7 



ence;" "The Jews and Moors in Spain;" "Industrial Education 
and its History;" "Egyptian Education;" "The Growth of Manual 
Training;" "Women in Public Life;" "Women of Missouri;" "Ed- 
ucation in Rome;" "The Influence of Luther and Melanchthon;" 
"The Growth of the Kindergarten." 

There was throughout the semester a high degree of interest 
in the daily exercises of the class and while the knowledge gained 
is conceded to be somewhat desultory it is believed to be of a 
kind that will not be easily lost. Toward the end of the semester 
some practice was. given in extemporaneous public speaking in 
the following way: A student having a paper for delivery on a 
given subject would be notified that on the following day he or 
she would be expected to give extemporaneously the contents of 
that paper. It Was thus found that they gave very good extem- 
poraneous talks as the outgrowth of several days' reading, study 
and writing. On other occasions students were called upon to 
rise without such notice and state to the class somewhat at length 
the contents of papers and reviews prepared by them. It was thus 
discovered to be a comparatively easy thing for a representative 
member of this class to speak 15 or 20 minutes extemporaneously, 
connectedly and interestingly concerning a subject on which a 
few days' preparation had been made. One thing is certain: 
These students begin to know how to use a library. They know 
where to go for certain information and they know how to use 
the information when they get it. It will be our purpose next 
year to follow in all these classes a somewhat similar plan, first 
enlarging our library a little and then somewhat more perfectly 
systematizing the plan of work. 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 

MISS PARRISH. 

Our Training School typifies a small, fairly well organized 
elementary school of about seventy children. These during the 
past year worked in six groups: First grade, second grade, third 
and fourth grades combined, fifth and sixth grades combined, 
seventh grade, eighth grade. Teachers for these children came 
chiefly from our Sophomore and Senior classes, a few strong 
Juniors assisting. 

Each group of children had six or seven daily recitations. 



8 



kirksville state normal school. 



The whole number of daily recitations therefore was about forty; 
The number of students offering to teach during each semester, 
about eighty; number permitted to teach during a given part of 
the semester, about thirty; number usually taking observation 
lessons and other instruction under the Supervisor with a view 
to preparation for practice, about fifty. A student once being 
assigned to the instruction of a Training School class in any sub- 
ject, it was sought to give such student one subject to teach for 
the full semester if possible so as to afford an opportunity to 
lead the class systematically through some definite part of the 
subject. 

The empiricism of the inexperienced, though well meaning 
prospective teacher is often very crude. Many trials are neces- 
sary to weed out those who are unskillful and slow to learn, so as 
to put them in groups by themselves for such instruction as will 
prepare them for the delicate task they seek to undertake. The 
good Training School Supervisor knows that teachers are neither 
born nor made. They have to grow. They have to learn what 
subjects children should be taught and the relation of these sub- 
jects to one , another and how one subject may be used to 
strengthen another. True enough, the "born teacher" learns 
faster than, others; but the system of gradation, the subjects 
suitable to each grade, the length of lessons, the means of illus- 
tration, the manner of government, the books, papers and maga- 
zines upon which to draw for daily lesson plans— to all these 
things the eyes of the inexperienced teacher must be opened. 

The distracting and immethodical processes of the novice 
cannot be tolerated. If the Training School is to be of value to 
any body the children in it must be well taught. Therefore we 
are compelled in the outset; to select our best Normal School 
students and permit only such to teach until one by one the alert, 
industrious, ambitious, inexperienced students can be picked out, 
instructed and .trained for service. Late in the season it was 
sought to give each prospective graduate opportunity to teach a 
little, though some had to get along with very little of such teach- 
ing and trust to what they could learn from systematic observa- 
tion and from the direct instruction of the Supervisor. 

Our Training School is not yet quite satisfactory to the Super- 
visor; but a similar state of things exists in about all the good 
Normal Schools of the country. Methods of conducting Train 
ing Schools are nearly everywhere undergoing changes. We are 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 9 



watching with eager eyes every good thing done in the Normal 
Schools of other states; Ave shall be able to do many things bet- 
ter next year than we did during the past year. Our graduates, 
as a rule, are acquainted with the gradation and organization of 
good public schools. They know approximately what is done 
and ought to be done in Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, Spell- 
ing, etc., in each of the grades. Many of our students during the 
past year had their eyes opened to the fact that children are 
capable of learning well a great deal more than they are ordina- 
rily permitted to do. This was illustrated by our work in Arith- 
metic, Reading, Geography, Literature and other subjects. Some 
illustrations are worth mentioning: Children of the second grade 
while covering well considerably more than is ordinarily done 
in the adopted Reader, Arithmetic and other subjects learned a 
large part of the following stories so as to be able to read them 
readily or write or tell them with ease and pleasure: Fifty 
Famous Stories Retold, Baldwin; Brooks and Brook Basins, Frye; 
Seven Little Sisters, Andrews; Grimm's Fairy Tales; In Myth- 
land, Beckwith; Robinson Crusoe; Stories of Heroes; Poems 
of Eugene Field. ■ 

Our third and fourth grade children now write or tell orally 
in large part the following stories: 

Snowbound; Miles Standish; Masque of Pandora; Rip Van 
Winkle; Enoch Arden; Ten Boys; Old Stories of the East; Round 
the year in Myth and Song; Abridged Story of the Iliad. 

One of our eighth grade teachers reports the following 
Literature as taught the children in that grade: 

Pictures from English Literature, Hamblin; Sketches from 
American Authors, Keysar; Merchant of Venice, Shakespeare, 
supplemented with much of the geography and history of Venice; 
Idylls of the King, Tennyson; Sohrab and Rustum; Silas Marner; 
Nature Poems; besides much other Literature woven in with 
the U. S. History, Geography and other lessons. The seventh 
and eighth grade classes took Guerber's "Stories of English His- 
tory" together; the eighth grade recited Merchant of Venice in 
the presence of the seventh grade and it is known that from 
merely hearing the recitations in Merchant of Venice the seventh 
grade have that great classic almost by heart and will require but 
little time for it next year. 

By comparison one may say that these Training School 
children had about as much work in Literature as the classes in 



10 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL, SCHOOL. 



the Normal School. But the children do correspondingly well in 
other things. They have access to a good library; they have 
very good equipment for the illustration of Arithmetic; they have 
the Dodd's Geographical Cabinet and some other supplies for 
Geography; they take frequent field lessons; they use the liter- 
ature for the illumination of Geography and History. All these 
subjects are taught somewhat in relation and each one greatly 
aids in the understanding of all the others. This is a Training 
School for the exemplification of right educational processes. 
We are able to bring to it rich and varied experiences acquired in 
other localities. We believe it is an essential and highly fruitful 
department of the Normal School. Through it we hope to work 
out even better things than have yet been done in any schools of 
Missouri. In any event we shall keep very close to the best 
things practiced in the best schools. 



LATIN. 

MR. GENTRY. 

The Latin course covers four years. The object in view from 
the beginning is to have students learn to read Latin rather than 
to translate into English; though much translation is done for 
the purpose of comparing the idioms of the two languages and 
also to improve the pupil's knowledge and use of his mother 
tongue. The three phases of language study, reading, writing 
and speaking are employed. Thoroughness in the work of the 
first year being indispeusible to success further on, students will 
not be passed from the beginner's book* until it is mastered. 
During the progress and toward the close of the first year's work 
such reading matter will be selected as seems best suited to the 
capacities and attainments of the pupils. 

The prose reading in the course includes four books of Caesar, 
four orations of Cicero and Sallust's War of Catiline. In connec- 
tion with all of the prose reading much oral and written compo- 
sition is done. The composition is based on the texts read. Ef- 
forts are continually made to induce pupils to form the habit of 
getting the thought of the Latin by taking the words of the Latin 
text in their order. Collateral reading in English bearing on the 
subject matter of the Latin being read will be done. 

The La tin poetry in the course includes four books of the 



KIRKSVILX.E STATE NORMAL^ SCHOOL. 



if 



Aeneid, thirty-five of the odes, five of the satires, and the Art 
Poetica of Horace. 

Efforts will be made to associate the rythra of the Latin 
poetry with the thoughts and feelings which it expresses. To this 
end passages in both Vergil and Horace that contain the best 
thoughts will be committed and recited rythmically. 

The mythology of the parts read of both Vergil and Horace 
will be studied from text books on the subject. 

Points in Syntax in variance from prose usage will be care- 
fully noted. 

The adopted text books are as follows: 

1. First Year's Latin — Collar and Daniell's First Latin Book, 
(Ginn & Co.) 

2. Caesar— -Kelsey, (Allyn & Bacon). 

3. Cicero— Allen & Greenough, (Ginn & Co.) 

4. Vergil, Comstock, (Allyn & Bacon). 

5. Sallust, Herbermann, (B. H. Sanborn & Co.) 

6. Horace, Shorey & Kirtland, (B. H. Sanborn & Co.). 

7. New Latin Composition, Daniell, (B. H. Sanborn & Co.) 

8. Mythology, Guerber, (American Book Co.) 



HISTORY. 

MR. VIOLETTE. 

The following courses are chiefly elementary in character. 
Most of the students will be going over these subjects for the 
first time. They will be obliged, therefore, to give themselves 
largely to the gathering of facts and the collection of data. But 
they will not be confined entirely to this kind of work. In each 
of the courses the aim will be to reveal the unity and continuity 
of history. To this end the relations of events to each other, the 
origin and development of institutions, the causes and results of 
movements will be given careful study and attention. It is in- 
tended by these courses to prepare the student to pursue ad- 
vanced work in these subjects with profit and advantage. 

In addition to the text-books, the student will be directed to 
the standard works, both general and special, which are to be 
found in the Normal Libraries. Some use will be made in class 
of the source extracts published by the Department of History 
of the University of Nebraska. The student will be required from 



kirksvil.ee state normal school. 



time to time to prepare outline maps and to report on topics as- 
signed for special investigation. Class exercises will be con- 
ducted by recitations, lectures, and written lessons. The courses 
are as follows: 

1. Ancient History.— This course will cover the period from 
earliest dawn of civilization to the downfall of the Roman Em- . 
pire in the West, 476 A. D. The history of the Old East will be 
passed over rather hastily so that more time may be given to 
Greek and Roman history. 

First semester, Sophomore year, English course. 
Text: Myers' Ancient History. 

2. Mediaeval and Modern History— This course will con- 
tinue the work begun in the Ancient History course, covering the 
period from the fall of the Roman Empire in the West to the 
present time. Nineteenth century history will receive special at- 
tention. 

Second semester, Sophomore year, English course. 
Text: Myers' Mediaeval and Modern History. 

3. English History.— This course will cover the entire 
period of English history from the earliest times to the present 
day. While all phases of the life of the English people will be 
considered, special attention will be given to the political and 
constitutional phases. 

First semester, Junior year, Latin and English courses. 
' Text: Green's Short History of the English People. 



CIVICS. 

MR. VAUGHN. 

Political Economy.— Students taking the English course 
have one semester of Political Economy during the Senior Year 
in which an opportunity is given to familiarize themselves with 
the elements of the subject. All the elementary text books on Eco- 
i nomics will be drawn upon and particular attention will be given 
! not only to those great principles growing out of the law of supply 
1 and demand but also to the legislation of various countries bear- 
ing upon trade relations and monetary systems of the United 
| States and other countries. 

Advanced American History and Government, for the 
■ Junior Class.— Movements in Europe which led to the Discovery 
and Settlements on western continent; the planting of the 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



13 



American colonies and the colonial system of government; strug- 
gle between French and English for control of continent shows 
the necessity for a union; different plans proposed; conflict of 
the colonists with the mother country; the constitution, the re- 
sult of a series of compromises of the different plans; First Crit- 
ical Period in American History— 1783 to 1789; Political History 
of the United States from 1789 to 1801; the acquisition of terri- 
tory by conquest and treaty. 

Treaties; the Institution 'of Slavery; the Civil War and the. 
period of reconstruction. 

Civil Government.— In order to obtain a knowledge of the 
constitution it is necessary not only to know the history of the 
colonies down to 177G, but also something of English History 
for five centuries before its adoption. With this end in view, it 
will be extremely important to know the history of the Great 
Charter wrested from King John in 1215; the formation of the 
House of Commons during the reign of Henry III; the Petition 
of Right in the reign of Charles I; the revolutions in 1G42 and 
1088. In this connection particular attention will be given to 
the charters by which the colonies were governed. Following 
this, the constitution will be studied from three standpoints: As 
a whole, analytically and historically. 

U. S. History for the Sub-Normal Classes. — A brief and 
intensive review of U. S. History: Discoveries; settlements, ends 
in view, failures and causes thereof; different nations attracted 
to certain localities; early colonial life; experiment in govern- 
ment, schools of practical statesmanship; charters; strength 
shown by inter-colonial wars; necessity for union; plans pro- 
posed; French and Indian War paving the way for independ- 
ence; the Revolution— causes, immediate and remote; three great 
campaigns of British, their failure; treaty of Paris; first critical 
period, interstate controversies, foreign relations, debts, origin 
of political parties, threats of secession, money theories, etc.; 
constitution adopted; industrial, commercial and political growth; 
acquisition of territory; slavery; recent facts., 

History and Government of Missouri.— Part of the sub- 
Norcnal semester will be given to the intensive study of the his- 
tory and government of Missouri, at least for those who need it. 
Text: Rader's History and Civil Government of Missouri. 



14 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE. 

MR. WBATHERLY. 



WORK OF THE PAST YEAR. 

Chemistry.— A new chemical laboratory containing fifty- six 
lockers has been fitted up in room 19. It is equipped so that each 
pupil has a set of apparatus. The following reference books have 

"been added during the year: Oswald's Solutions, Oswald's Out- 
lines of General Chemistry, Oswald's Foundations of Analytical 
Chemistry, Nernst's Theoretical Chemistry, Thorp's General 
Chemistry (2 vols.), Remsen's Elementary Chemistry, Torrey's 
Studies in Chemistry, Johnston's Chemistry of Common Life, 
The Soil by King, and Venable's Short History of Chemistry. 

It has been the aim of the work to teach the pupil to use his 
senses, i. e., to observe accurately, to state facts clearly and com- 
pletely in notes. The student puts down in his note book the 
facts observed at the time he observes them. Laboratory work 
demands decisions. These are to be put in the best form. The 
mechanical and demoralizing system of note books with "opera- 

' tions," "observations," and "inference" headings has been dis- 

■3 couraged. It has been expected of the student that he write 
down. what he does and what he observes in chronological order. 
Hence the note books have been different. The students are dif- 

• ferent, the note books should be. Quantitative work has been the 
characteristic feature. The method followed was that of Dr. 
Torrey of Harvard University. Two members of the class were 
allowed to work together setting up the apparatus and perform- 
ing the experiment. Each member of the class was expected to 
be able to manipulate the bending of glass tubing. During the 
current year, the class devoted two hours a day five days in a 
week to the work. About two-thirds of the year was devoted to 
chemical theory and one-third to the study of individual elements. 
No text book was used. The class did much reading in the ref- 
erence books. An estimate of a student's ability was determined 

/ by his ability to use an accurate. vocabulary of the science; power 
to discuss logically the experiments; ability to keep an accurate 
account of experiments, discussions, and notes; power to apply 
principles to the solutions of new problems presented by experi- 
ments, more than upon the result of frequent text examinations. 
Phyhk s.— Room has been fitted up for a physical labora- 



16 



KIRKSVILIjE STATE NORiNIAL SCHOOL. 



tory. The following reference books have been added during 
the year: Deschanel's Natural Philosophy (4 vols.), Nichols and 
Franklin's Elements of Physics (3 vols.), Carhart's University 
Physics (2 vols.), Barker's Physics, Hall and and Bergen's 
Physics. 

Physics has been taught very much in the same manner as 
Chemistry. About two-thirds of the year's work was taught 
without a text book. The experiments were performed with 
simple or ^home-made" apparatus as far as possible. Most of 
the experiments were performed with a view of correct, quanti- 
tative results. The members of the class made, from such mater- 
ial as may be gathered anywhere without expense, several pieces 
of "school-made'% apparatus. Graphic solutions of problems 
were introduced when it was possible. 

FOR THE COMING YEAR. 
. Chemistry.— This subject comes in the Junior year; it con- 
stitutes a continuous course of 40 weeks. To do 40 weeks work, 
it is expected that the student spend 40 weeks in the class. Those 
entering this subject should have a good knowledge of algebra 
and geometry. 

Physics.— This subject is taken up in the Senior year, and is 
continued throughout the year. Physics requires a course in 
mathematics through trigonometry. 



NATURAL SCIENCE. 

MR. DOUGHERTY AND MISS JACKSON. * 

Physiology.— The human body is studied as a working or- 
ganism. Hence the work consists largely of experiments, and 
of the dissection of various animals closely related to man in 
structure and function of their organs. The course is distinct- 
ively a laboratory course in practical physiology. Colton's Phys- 
iology is used as a guide. 

. The department is supplied with an articulated skeleton, an- 
atomical charts, the Bock-Steger models, and plenty of micro- 
scopes. 

Physical Geography.— Tarr's Physical Geography is u-ed 
as the basis of this work. The work, however, is for the most 
part done in the field, and in the laboratory. The student is 
taken to Nature whenever it is possible; when it is not possible 



KIRKSVJLLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



17 



then Nature is brought to the laboratory; for this part of the 
work much help 4s afforded by the material contained in our 
valuable collection of rocks and minerals in the museum. 

Much attention is given to Meteorology. The students make 
daily observations of the clouds, wind, temperature, etc., and 
record the same. 

Agriculture.— The student is first brought to a practical 
knowledge of living plants, the functions of the parts of a plant, 
the factors and processes of growth, and the reproduction of 
plants. j 

Next a study of the environment of the plant is taken up; this 
includes: The soil, its origin, structure, composition, and prop- 
erties; field work to study the soils in situ; laboratory work in 
the analysis of soils; tilling and draining of soils. The subjects 
of air, heat, light, moisture (which includes the whole subject of 
weather) are taken up. 

Practical study is made of the enemies and diseases of plants 
and of their prevention and remedies. 

Biology.— The student begins with unicellular organisms and 
traces the development on up through the more complex forms 
of plant and animal life through that of mammals. Much field 
work is done to afford opportunity for the study of plants and 
animals in their natural environment; of the struggle for exist- 
ence; distribution of organisms; color and its - significance in 
plants and animals; covering of animals and plants; means of 
defense and various kindred topics. # 

The student is required to keep a note-book containing a rec- 
ord of his observations, as well as sketches and drawings where- 
ever possible. Constant attention is given to the methods of 
presenting the subject to the various grades in the public schools.. 

We are well equipped for and do work by the laboratory 
method. We have twenty-eight good microscopes, and tables 
fitted up in such a manner as to enable us to do up-to-date work. 

Science Library.— We have within the last year added many 
valuable recent works in Biological science, and students are 
required to consult them, and to report their results. 



ENGLISH. 

* MR. SETTLE AND MISS HALL. 

Sub-Normai Semester.— Before entering the Freshman year 



18 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



in English the student must have a practical knowledge of Eng- 
lish Grammar and Composition. To this end students not already 
well grounded in English Grammar will pursue this subject dur- 
ing the Sub-Normal period of five months. They will also have 
•much drill and practice in composition. A knowledge of Myth- 
vology being necessary to a proper understanding and appreciation 
x>f American and English Literature, part of the Sub-Normal 
Semester is devoted to the study of Guerber's ''Myths of Greece 
mid Rome." When this subject was introduced last year there 
.was considerable opposition to it; but no classes in Literature 
during the second semester of the year were more popular than 
those in Myths of Greece and Home. The book is charmingly 
written and the stories are such as all lovers of Literature are 
bound to be interested in and all good students readily learn. 
The relation of Mythology to our own Literature will be shown 
by weaving in occasional examples from American and English 
Literature and showing how the interpretation of these depends 
upon our knowledge of Mythology. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Rhetoric (without a text book) —Classification of sentences 
as to form, uses, length, etc.; whether correct or incorrect, loose 
or periodic, etc.; paragraphs, figures of speech. 

Expression-.— Concord, clearness, unity, energy, harmony; 
some study of literary style. 

> ^English and American Classics suited to the above; much 
-composition work; during this year students should become famil- 
iar with such literature as the following: 

Evangeline; Hiawatha; Courtship of Miles Standish; 
A Hunting of the Deer and Other Papers; Sketch Book; Sesame 
and Lilies; Vision of Sir Launfal; Snowbound; Ivanhoe; Won- 
der Book. They should make a critical study of at least 
one Shakespearean Play; but it is to be understood that 
neither the teacher nor the class will be handicapped by pre- 
scribed rules since some classes need more elementary work than 
others. The principal purpose of the year's work in Literature 
is to become as familiar as possible with the more simple and 
popular American and English Classics and at the same time to 
.acquire a reasonably clear and easy style of expression. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Rhetoric (without a text book).— Much attention to be given 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



19 



to forms of composition, letters, description, narration, etc.; dis- 
tinguishing characteristics of -prose and poetry. During the first 
semester sufficient attention to forms of Composition is to be 
given to enable students to write correctly from habit and to 
detect readily inaccuracies in the composition of others and to 
pass somewhat readily upon the character and style of the com- 
position of others. During this semester the work in Literature 
is to be continued and at least a few such master pieces studied 
as: Webster's "Reply to Hayne;" Scott's "Lady of the Lake;" 
The Sir Roger de Co verley Papers; Tennyson's "Enoch Arden" 
and one or two of the Shakespearean Plays. The second semes- 
ter of the year is to be devoted to the critical study of Rhetoric 
with the text book in ,the hands of the student: Herrick and 
Damon's Rheoric. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS. 

So little has been done thus far in the matter of systema- 
tizing the English Course that it is deemed inadvisable to at- 
tempt to specify the several master pieces for each of these years 
separately. In so far as such systematizing of the subject can be 
effected it will be the purpose of the Department to establish ap- 
proximately the order of procedure and to make the same public 
at as early a date as possible. It is thought, however, that the 
work of the Junior year should include a history of American Lit- 
erature to the present time and entire familiarity with the princi- 
pal authors and the philosophic grouping of all American Litera- 
ture. The Senior year will be devoted to the critical and philo- 
sophical reading *of masterpieces of English Literature for the 
purpose of giving the student critical acumen, a love for good lit- 
erature and a quickening of his own mental powers to compose. 
This course furnishes the student with: 

1. A historical description of the condition and tendency 
of each of the great literary periods. 

2. A fair, critical and biographical review of representative 
authors. 

3. A complete specimen of each of these great writers' most 
finished and famous compositions. 

This is intended to include a study of English Literature by 
epochs. Types of the literature of each epoch are to be studied 
critically. The literary studies are to include a careful study of 
the drama, the reading of which should be presented in the study 
of the origin, n.tture and classification of the drama; the study 



20 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



of romantic poetry, including some investigation of its sources 
and the study of fiction as representing an important type of 
modern literature. 

Note— A reasonable amount of composition, memorizing and 
Oilglr.it 1 productions will be required regularly in all classes, to 
the cud \<t the Normal School graduate may ultimately Write 
and spink iUhAly, fluently and clearly, and be able to illuminate 
his writing and speaking from a ready command of well digested 
literary master pieces. Thereby he may hope to be a worthy 
leader of tlm school children whose teacher he is to be. 

MATHEMATICS. 

MB* HARVEY AND MISS PREWITT. 

A brief and comprehensive course in Arithmetic is to be given 
those students of the Sub-Normal semester who are not yet pre- 
pared for Algebra. This will consist of a critical study of writ- 
ten Arithmetic about three days in the week and a sharp drill 
in Mental Arithmetic about two days in the week. Heretofore 
many students on entering the Normal School have asked per- 
mission to pursue two mathematical studies at the same time. 
It is not deemed wise to permit this. AVe therefore expect stu- 
dents of Arithmetic first to finish that subject and then take up 
the Algebra. It should be noticed that Arithmetic is one of the 
elementary school subjects which is to receive some special at- 
tention in the department of Pedagogy during the second semes- 
ter of the Freshman year. Those people who#have got so far 
along as the Freshman year Avithout an accurate knowledge of 
Arithmetic and how to deal with it will have a good stirring up 
toward the end of the Freshman year. One year will be devoted 
to the mastery of Milne's High School Algebra, the book used in 
the public schools of the State. Some experiments during the 
past year have demonstrated the fact that this can easily be 
done by Normal School students. This does hot mean that 
any teacher will be confined exclusively to this text book; but 
it does mean that the adopted text book will be mastered and 
that with this mastery a pretty thorough knowledge of Algebra 
will be acquired. Students who have other text books should 
bring them along so that light may be thrown upon the subject 
not only from the standpoint of the teacher but from all author- 
ities accessible. 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



21 



In Geometry constructional and inveutional work will be in- 
troduce^. The text will be Phillips and Fisher's Plane and Solid 
Geometry but much use will be made of other recent text books 
such as Wentworth's, Wells', Bowser's and others. 

The Board of Regents at their recent session, recognizing 
the importance of Mathematics and aware of the fact that our 
Mathematical course should be more extensive, voted an addi- 
tional year of Mathematics but left it to the student's choice 
whether the same should be pursued this year or not. This ad- 
ditional year's work will embrace Spherical Trigonometry and 
Analytical Geometry. 

Classes for the present will continue to use Crockett's Plane 
Trigonometry. Text books for the more advanced classes will be 
determined when such classes are organized. 

READING, VOICE CULTURE AND PHYSICAL 
CULTURE. 

MISS OWEN. 

This department is for strictly practical purposes. Its first 
and most important product is a class of students able to read 
intelligently and without hesitation the ordinary descriptive and 
narrative literature of daily life. This means oral reading. It is 
not to any great extent for dramatic display. It is to break up 
bad habits such as nasal tones, stammering, unnecessary loudness 
and conscious /imitation of other people's voices and manner. It 
is to acquaint the student fully with all the elementary sounds of 
the language, to give him a discriminating ear and by abundant 
practice to secure for him, so far as possibe, the mastery of pro- 
nunciation, articulation and enunciation. It makes the dictionary 
his close companion. It is ultimately to free him from constraint 
and from annoying self-consciousness while reading to others 
just what he sees in the subject matter to be read. 

Our students come from a variety of schools, most of them 
ill-trained in the principles of pronunciation. Their proper train- 
ing demands scrutinizing care and the utmost alertness on the 
part of the teacher, and almost endless practice on the part of 
themselves in order to acquire reasonable skill in expression. 
Respiration, attitudes and all such essentials to easy and natural 
delivery are carefully looked after. Vigorous exercises in march- 
ing, wand drills and other light gymnastics occur about twice a 
week. 



22 



KIEKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



Outside the regular and systematic exercises in this depart- 
ment, a room was furnished during the past year for basket 
ball, hand ball and other games. This is the beginning of our 
gymnasium. The young men and women have organized sep- 
arately into several basket ball teams. It is practically certain 
that the health of many students has been preserved by these free, 
exciting and altogether harmless games. Young ladies especially 
are encouraged to play on the basket ball teams at least once or 
twice a week. It is our purpose to increase the facilities for all 
these games and exercises. 



MANUAL TRAINING AND DOMESTIC ART. 

, MISS BRYAN. 

The object of Manual Training in the public schools is the de- 
velopment of the mind through the education of the hand and eye. 
It is to familiarize the pupil with tools, materials and processes 
and to cultivate habits of thoughtfulness and accuracy. It is not 
to make mechanics or to teach trades, though the bases for 
many trades are involved. It has as great educational value as 
any purely mental training ordinarily has. The aim is not nec- 
essarily a highly finished piece of work, not necessarily great 
mechanical dexterity but rather a mastery of underlying prin- 
ciples and logical processes and an intelligent working out of 
things undertaken.' Just so soon as the student is able to turn 
out a given product in approximately perfect condition just that 
soon the intelligent teacher of Manual Training directs the stu- 
dent to the construction of something else so as to keep the cre- 
ative ingenuity of the mind all the time active. 

The shop work consists of a series of carefully graded exer- 
cises, so planned as to embody many constructive principles, each 
exercise bringing into play new tools or new uses of the same 
tools. Tool instruction: 

Names and uses of tools, their evolution and improvement 
through the ages. , Care of tools including sharpening. 

1. Squaring and planing to dimension. 

2. First saw cuts, straight, GO , 45°, 30°. 
, 3. Use of gauge, repeated saw cuts. 

4. Chiseling. 
- 5. Half lap joint. 

6. , Open mortise and tenon. 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



23 



7. Straight chiseling and fitting key, 

8. Plain mortise and tenon. 

9. Plain dovetail. 

10. The ship splice. 

11. Frame work joint. 

12. Simple slip joint. 

13. Triple dovetail. ? 

14. The triangle. 

15. Half dovetail mortise and tenon. 

16. . Hidden dovetail. 

17. Chamfering exercise. 

18. Angular fitting. f i 

19. Secret dovetail. 

20. Oblique dovetail.' 

21. Original project. 

It is intended that the work in Domestic Art shall contribute- 
to the ability of the pupil to do with skill many of the things 
that women in all walks of life are frequently called upon to do. 
The work is correlated with composition and science in that a 
history of materials used is a part of the course and pupils are 
expected to be able to explain and describe operations taught. 

EQUIPMENT. 

Needles, thread, yarn, darning cotton, hooks and eyes, emery 
bags, tape measures, cotton, linen and woolen fabrics. 

COURSE. 

1. Overhanding on paper, calico, gingham and muslin. 

2. Teaching true bias, including matching of figures. 

3. Hemming— paper, coarse muslin, cretonne and the 
"French" hem.. 

4. Stitching— running, half back, complete back, overcasting 
edge, hem basting, slip stitch. 

5. Weaving and darning. 

6. Felling and overcasting— common and "French." 

7. The gusset— gathering. 

8. Three ways of sewing on tape— use of each. 

9. Button holes and blind stitch. 

10. Eyelets. : ; '? 

11. Flannel— sewing and pressing. 

12. Patchings plaid patch, matching of plaids, figured patch 
overhanded. 



24 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



13/ Hemstitching— whipping and sewing on of nifties. 

14. Three ways of darning on cashmere. 

15. Pressing. 

16. Exercises in embroidery and working out original designs. 

17. Drafting— fitting and making garments. 

In addition to instruction in bench work and Domestic Art 
for Normal students, Miss Bryan will organize and supervise 
sloyd and other elementary Manual Training in the Training 
School. 

VOCAL MUSIC. 

MISS TINKHAM. 

All prospective teachers are expected to know at least the 
rudiments of vocal music. The entire time of a skillful teacher 
Is to be devoted to this subject. 

ART INSTRUCTION. 

A competent teacher will be employed and daily classes 
maintained in drawing. This department will co-operate with 
and supplement the work in manual training. 



"MISSOURI MODEL" FOR RURAL SCHOOL HOUSES. 



KERK8VILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL,. 



25 



.TABULAR VIEW OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

SUB -NORMAL COURSE. 

By action of the Board of Regents, June 18th, 1900, the first 
semester of the Sub-Normal Course is discontinued. This means 
that students entering this School and needing instruction below 
the Freshman year, i. e., in Reading, Geography, Arithmetic, U. 
S. History, Grammar, Physiology, etc, must be able to hnish all 
that work and get started in the elements of Algebra and Litera- 
ture during a period of five months. 

This action of the Regents is fully justified by the experience 
of the past year, since there were comparatively few students 
who did not clear up all that was left for them to do in the com- 
mon school branches during the first' five months of their attend- 
ance. 

NORMAL SCHOOL COURSES 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



LATIN COURSE. 

Eng. and Am. Classics (5) 

Latin (first Latin, book) (5) 

Algebra (5) 

Reading and Physical Cul- 
ture (5) 

School Economy (2) 

Drawing ,..,,,.,./.! (2) 



' ENGLISH COURSE. 

Eng. and Am, Classics (5) 

Ph. Geography (5) 

Algebra , (5) 

Reading and Physical Cul- 
ture (5) 

Drawing (2) 

School Economy (2) 



SECOND SEMESTER, 



LATIN COURSE. 

Eng. and Am. Classics (5) 

Latin (first Latin book) (5) 

Plane Geometry or Algebra.. (5) 

Drawing or Music , (3) 

Specific Lessons in the so 
called 'common branches". (2) 



ENGLISH COURSE. 

Eng. and Am. Classics (5) 

Agriculture (5) 

Plane Geometry or Algebra. (5) 

Drawing or Music ..(3) 

Specific Lessons in the so 
called "common branches". (2) 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER. 
LATIN COURSE. ENGLISH COURSE. 

English (5) 1. English (5) 

Latin (Caesar) .(5) 2. Ancient History (5) 

Biology (5) 3. Biology (5) 

Pedogogy (3) or Practice (5) 4. Pedagogy (3) or Practice.... (j) 

Music Or Manual 't raining.. (3) - 5. Music or Manual Training. . (3) 



26 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



LATIN COURSB. 

Rhetoric 

Latin (Caesar and Cicero.. 

Biology 

Practice (5) or Pedagogy.. 
Manual Training 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

ENGLISH COURSB. 

.(5) 1. Rhetoric (6) 

.(5) 2. Mediaeval and Modern His- 

.(5) tory (5) 

.(3) 3. Biology (5) 

.(2) 4. Practice (5) or Pedagogy.... (3) 

5. Manual Training.. (2) 



JUNIOR YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

LATIN COURSB. 

1. English History (5) 

2. Latin (Cicero and Vergil). . .(5) 

3. Chemistry (5) 

4. Solid Geometry (4) 

5. Psychology (3) 



ENGLISH COURSB. 

1. English History.... (6) 

2. English (5) 

3. Chemistry (5) 

4. Solid Geometry (4) 

5. Psychology .(3) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



LATIN COURSE. 

American History 

Latin (Vergil) 

Chemistry 

Plane Trigonometry... 



•(4) 
• (5) 
.(5) 
•(4) 

Graded Schools of Missouri. .(2) 



ENGLISH COURSE. 

American History (4) 

English (5) 

CL<?mistry (5) 

Plane Trigonometry (4) 

Graded Schools of Missouri. . (2) 



LATIN COURSE 



1. 




(5) 


2. 




(5) 


3. 




(5) 


4. 




(i) 


6. 


Practice (5) or Manual Train 








(2) 



LATIN COURSE. 

English Literature (5) 

Latin (Horace) (5) 

Physics (5) 

History of Education (3) 

Practice (5) 



SENIOR YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

ENGLISH COURSB. 

1. English Literature (5) 

2. Pol. Economy (5); or Gor- 
man (5); or Manual Train- 
ing (2) 

3. Physics (5) 

4. College Algebra (4) 

I 5. Practice (5) 

SECOND SEMESTER. ^ 

ENGLISH COURSE. 

1. English Literature (6) 



and 



2. German (5) or Manual Train- 

ing (2) 

3. Physics (5) 

4. History of Education (3) 

5. Practice (5) 

Analytical Geometry , optional in 



• i Note— Spherical Trigonometry 
Senior year. 

Note— The figures in parenthesei indicate the number of recitations per 
week. 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



27 



REMARKS ON COURSE OF STUDY. 

1. Students are recommended to take the Latin Course for 
the reason that professional teachers are called upon for larger 
resources in language than the English course affords. But they 
should, nevertheless, consider carefully the whole matter from 
their respective view points, select one course or the other and 
pursue it to the exclusion of other things which in any way in- 
terfere with its completion. 

2. Set up the land marks as you go. It will be found emi- 
nently desirable to bring all subjects abreast. The student on 
entering should attempt as soon as possible to finish the work 
of some one year in the Latin Course or the English Course. 
This is desirable for two reasons: First, ihat one may be in the 
regular line of promotion so as to articulate easily with the re- 
spective classes as advancement is made from year to year; 
second, one of the most highly gratifying and stimulating agencies 
of the past year was the class organization. No student or 
teacher of the past year will ever forget the power and influence 
of the Sophomore Class, a group of strong men and women, about 
100 in number, who met from week to week, had their own or- 
ganization and their own program, and contributed so much to 
the assistance of one another and to the strengthening of the 
student spirit of the entire school. 

3. Number of subjects: It will be noticed that the schedule 
of studies contemplates from three to four subjects each semester 
requiring preparation and from one to two subjects that may be 
designated as drills. In no event should a student attempt to have 
more than five recitation periods daily. Out of these five there 
should be not to exceed four recitations in subjects requiring 
preparation. Three subjects requiring preparation give still more 
satisfactory results. 

4. German and Greek: It is intended to give courses in/Jrcr- 
man and Greek as soon as classes of sufficient size demand in- 
struction in these subjects and it is the further intention to en- 
courage the organization of classes in these subjects until there 
will be at least a four years' course in German and two years' 
course in Greek. Demand is constantly made on the school for 

, graduates who have the sound scholarship which these subjects 
help to build up. 



28 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



WORKING PROGRAM, SHOWING ORGANIZATION 
OCT. 27, 1899. 



Teacher 
and Room 

am- 


Kirk 

20 


RlCHARD- 
6 


Haj,l 
R. R. 


Norton 
8 


Prewitt 
5 


Westlakk 
4 


- 

8:35 

to ■ 
9:15 


i 


Freshman 
Latin 

1st Latin 
Book 

39 


Senior 
English 

30 


Sophomore 
Rhet. 

30 


Mid. 
Sub. 
Physiol. 

42 


Sub. 
Classics 

19 


Sub. 
U. S. H. 

26 


9:20 
to 
10:00 


l 


Freshman 

School 
Economy 

36 


Junior 
English 

33 ' 


Sophomore 
Com p. 

17 


Senior 
Algebra 

33 


Sub. 
Classics 

27 


Sub. 
U. S. H. 

27 


10:00? 
10:30 J 


Thirty minutes for chapel exercises. 


10:30 

to - 
11:10 




Freshman 

School 
Economy 

45 


Middle 
Sub. 
Grammar 

47 


Sophomore 
Comp. 

14 


Junior 
Solid 
Geometry 

33 


Middle 
Sub. 
Algebra 

36 


Middle 
Sub. 
Civ. Gov't 
(Hinsdale) 

16 


11:15 

to < 
11:55 




Sophomore 
Pedagogy 

44 or 41 


Middle 
Sub. 
Grammar 

43 


Sub. 
Classics 

17 


Freshman 
Algebra 

23 


Middle 
Freshman 
Algebra 

32 


Middle 
Sub. 
Civ. Gov't 
(Rader) 

37 




*1 -05 i ^ Qe k° ur an< ^ * en m i nutes f° r hc^dinner. 


• ] 


1:05 
to 

L:45 




Junior 
Psychol'gy 

28 


Middle 
Sub. 
Grammar 

36 


Freshman 
Classics 

19 


Freshman 
Algebra 

38 . 


Middle 
Sub. 
Algebra 

38 


Sub. 
Arithmetic 

24 


r 

1:50 | 

m to i 

2:30 J 

l 


Freshman 
Latin , 

1st Latin 
Book 

25 


Freshman 
Classics 

30 


Sophomore 
Ancient 
History 

37 


Freshman 

Plane 
Geometry 

41 


Middle 

Sub. 
Algebra 

17 


Junior 
English 
History 

13 



NOTE— The figures show the number in each class on October 27, 1809. 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NOREAL SCHOOL. 



29 



WORKING PROGRAM, SHOWING ORGANIZATION 
OCT. 27, 1899— CONTINUED. 



DOBSON 
1 


Gentry 
3 


Weath- 

ERLY 
9-19 


Dough- 
erty 
7 


Owen 
E. H. 


Ross 
2 


Garwick 

■ A 


Junior 
English 
History 

19 


Freshman 
Latin 

35 


Junior 
Chemistry 

32 


Sophomore 
Biol. 

34 


Sub. 
R. & V. C. 

35 


Mid. Fr. 
Drawing 

36 




Sophomore 
Ancient 
History 

43 


Sophomore 
Latin 
(Caesar) 

38 




Freshman 
Physical 
Geography 

33 


Sub. 
R. & V. C. 

39 


Sub. 
Geug. 

23 





Sophomore 
Ancient 
History 


Mid. Fr. 

Latin 
Middle of 
1st Latin 

Book 


Senior 
Physics 


Sophomore 
Biol. 


Sub. 
R.&V.C. 


Sub. 
Geog, 


Beginning 
Music 


39 


32 


12 


32 


27 


14 


20 


-Sub. 
U. S. H. 


Junior 
Latin 
(Cicero) 




Sophomore 
Biol. 


Freshman 
R.&V.C. 


Vertical 
Writing 


Sophomoro 
Music 


26 


16 




34 


25 


20 


41 or 44 



Senior 
Political 
Economy 


Senior 
Latin 
(Sallust) 


Mid. Sub. 
Physiol. 


Sophomore 
Biol. 


Sub. 
R.&V.C. 


* Sub. 
Arith. 




18 


27 


16 


35 


20 


36 




Mid. Sub. 
Civ. Gov't 
(Hinsdale) 


Mid. Soph. 

Latin 
Middle of 
Ceesar 


Junior 
Chem. 


Sophomore 
Biol. 


Freshman 
R.&V.C. 


Sub. 
Arith. 


Beginning 
#Music 


35 


15 


32 


11 


18 


28 


, 15 



30 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



TEXT BOOKS. 

It is the intention to use in the main the same text books in 
this Normal School as are used in the public schools of the state, 
but with this reservation: That new and improved books may 
occasionally be introduced when the same are manifestly better 
adapted to the needs of the school than the older ones are. 

Students should bring with them all their text-books, since 
many of their old books not needed for class-room purposes will 
still be useful for reference. 

The adopted books are in the list below and printed in italics: 

Agriculture: James, Voorhees, Bailey. 

Algebra: Smith, Weritworth's Shorter Course, Milne. 

Arithmetic: Milne, Speer. 

Arithmetic, Mental: White. 

Biology: Boyer. 

Botany: Bergen, Gray, Youmans, Wood, Bessey. 
Chemistry: Shepard, Torrey. 
Civil Government: Hinsdale, Rader. 
Drawing: White, Prang. 
English History: Green. 
Geography: Rand-McNally, Natural, Frye. 
Geometry: Wells, Wentworth, Phillips and Fisher. 
Grammar: Whitney, Conklin, Reed and Kellogg, Patrick, 
Southwort)i and Goddard. 

History, Ancient: Myers. 
History, M'odern: Myers. 

History and Civil Government of Missouri: Rader. 

History of Education: Painter, Quick, Gompayre. 

History of the United States: Montgomery, Barnes, Rid- 
path, Scudder, McMaster, Fiske, Morris. 

Latin: Grammar— Bennett, Allen and Greenough. First Year 
—First Latin Book, Collar and Daniell; Second Year— Caesar, 
Kelsey; Composition, Daniell; Cicero, Allen arid Greenough, (two 
orations}; Third Year— Cicero (two orations); Vergil, Gomstock; 
Fourth Year— Sallust, Herbermann; Horace^ Shorey and Kirtland; 
■ New Latin Composition, Daniell. 

Literature: Blaisdell, Hawthorne and Lemon, Matthews, 
Painter, Taine, Royce, Welsh.' 

Music: Not yet adopted. 

M> r iology : v Guerbcr. 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



31 



Penmanship: Natural System. 

Physics: Hall and Bergen, Gage. \ 

Physical Geography: Tarr. 

Physiology: Carpenter, Martin, Golton, Baldwin, Stowell. 

Psychology: Halleck, Roark. 

Rhetoric: Herrick and Damon. 

Trigonometry: Crockett. 

Zoology: Holder, Colton, Packard, Orton. 

DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES. 

Certificates of advancement signed by the President are 
given to those who complete the Freshman Year in either the 
Latin Course or the English Course; also to those who complete 
the Junior Year. 

To those who complete the Sophomore Year in either the 
Latin Course or the English Course the "Elementary Certificate" 
is given showing the course completed. This Certificate author- 
izes the holder to teach in any county of Missouri for a period of 
two years from date. 

To those who complete the Senior Year in either the English 
Course or the Latin Course the diploma of the school is given 
designating the course completed. 

This diploma authorizes the holder to teach In any public 
school of Missouri during life, if not revoked for cause. 

GRADUATE COURSE. 

MASTER OP SCIENTIFIC DIDACTICS. 

This diploma will be issued to such graduates as teach suc- 
cessfully for three years after graduation and complete a course 
of reading such as the one designated below. 

Each applicant 1 shall submit satisfactory proof of such 
course of reading as well as evidence of successful teaching, all 
of which shall be considered and passed upon by the President 
and Faculty. Each applicant shall also submit a thesis of from 
4,000 to 5,000 words on some educational subject, both subject 
and thesis being approved by the Faculty. In view of the abund- 
ance of new educational literature candidates for graduation in 
•Tune, 1901, are recommended to submit reviews of one or more 
of the recent publications on some pedagogical subject. Candi- 
dates for this degri v must send to the President of the Faculty 



32 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



their theses or reviews and evidence of the course they have 
pursued at least four weeks before Commencement, They must 
be present Commencement Day to receive their diplomas, 
uuavoidable circumstances alone excusing tliem. The following 
course of reading is recommended: 

1. Buckle's "History of Civilization in England," or Draper's 
"History of the Intellectual Development of Europe," or Leckey's 
"European Morals." 

2. Klemm's "European Schools," or Davidson's "Education 
of the Greek People," or Quick's "Educational Reformers." 

3. McLellan and Dewey's "Psychology of Number," or Hins- 
dale's "Teaching the Language Arts," or FroebePs "Education 
of Man." 

4. Greenwood's "Principles of Education Practically Ap- 
plied," or Sully's "Teachers' Hand Book of Psychology," or Park- 
er's "Talks on Pedagogics." 

5. Rosenkranz's "Philosophy of Education," or "Spencer's 
"Education," or James's "Talks on Psychology and Life's Ideals." 

6. Halleck's "Education of the Central Nervous System," or 
Romanes's "Animal Intelligence," or Warner's "Study of Chil- 
dren. 

7. Burrage and Bailey's "Sanitation and Decoration," or 
Kotelmann'^ "School Hygiene," or McArthur's "Education in its 
Relation to Manual Industry." 

8. Froebel's "Pedagogics of the Kindergarten," or one 
year's reading of "The Educational Review," or one year's read- 
ing of The J. 0. Witter Co.'s "Art Education. 

9. Baldwin's "School Management and School Methods." 
r!^y:':.:^: :. • „ : ■ ,; ■ . . " ( 

LIBRARIES. 

Our General Library, consisting of some three thousand 
standard works of Science, Poetry, Fiction, Art and History, is 
thrown open from 8:00 a. m. to 3:30 p. in. daily. Students are 
permitted to enter this Library at will, select such books as they 
desire to read and use the large Assembly Room or Chapel as a 
Reading Room, returning the books to the library when done with 
them. When books are taken out to be carried farther than the 
Reading Room a record is made of the fact. 



KIRKSVILLE STATU NORMAL SCHOOL. 



33 



A NEW FEATURE. 

During the past year a small special library was placed in 
each of the regular recitation rooms; also in the Training School 
Department. These special libraries contribute in a high degree 
to the efficiency of the several departments. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Among the students four Literary Societies are maintained, 
the Philomathean, Senior, Zetosophian and Websterian Debating 
Society. Their meetings are held on Friday night or Saturday 
night of each week in well lighted halls. These societies are 
placed, so far as possible, on a self-governing basis and member- 
ship made optional with the student. The first three societies 
have been organized for many years and have such membership 
as to crowd their large halls to the utmost during the greater part 
of the year. The Websterian Debating Society is composed of 
about thirty young men chiefly in the Freshman year. The iirst 
three societies have exercises of many varieties including debates, 
orations, essays, declamations, music, etc. The Websterian De- 
bating Society confines itself chiefly to extemporaneous debates 
and orations. All students above the Freshman year are recom- 
mended to join one of these societies, yet it is not deemed advisa- 
ble to make membership in any society compulsory since the 
daily exercises in the Departments of Heading, History, Civics, 
Literature and Pedogogy cover almost all varieties of exercises 
which can be given in a Literary Society and it is held that the 
•foundation for all really valuable society work and other public 
exercises must first be laid in the more systematic and thorough 
instruction of the classes in these and other departments of the 
institution. During the coming year students will be encouraged 
to organize additional debating societies similar to the Webster- 
ian for there seems to be no doubt that the class of young men 
of whom this Society was composed profited far more by the 
work done in their Society than they would have done by mem- 
bership in the other societies. This will not in any sense militate 
against the three old societies. They will continue to have a very 
large membership, sufficient beyond doubt to crowd their halls 
to the utmost. 



34/ KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

; : DICIPLINH. 

During the past year the school was put upon a self -governing 
basis. Our students are understood to be men and women whose 
purposes are well settled, who have no time to lose, who have 
their life work mapped out before them. We have no spying 
upon students' conduct and no checks or deportment marks for 
those trifling delinquencies which are liable to occur among the 
best of students. All students are put upon their honor. They 

- are requested to behave in the presence of the President and 
Faculty just as they would, do in the absence of such persons. 
In passing from room to room and in the Assembly Room, ex- 
cepting during exercises, students are encouraged to engage in 
quiet and pleasant conversation; they are made to feel 'as tree 
from constraint as possible. It is thus found that the students 
themselves take much pride in the good discipline of the School. 
Disorder disturbs them as much as it disturbs the Faculty. They 
feel, as they have a right to feel, that 1hey and the B'aculty to- 
gether build up the moral tone of the institution. This consti- 
tutes the governing power. Ours is a discipline of self-control. 
It is a purely democratic plan of government. It relieves the 

1 Faculty of innumerable petty duties, appeals constantly to the 
manly and womanly pride of the students and renders the school 
a pleasant place. These students have a future of great promise. 
They realize this fact. They expect to control others. They are 
to be the teachers of Missouri. "He who would govern others 
must first learn to govern himself." 

MEDALS. 

The It. M. Ringo Medal.— -For the best original oration, It. 
M. Ringo, Treasurer of the Board of Regents, awards annually 
a $20.00 Gold Medal; but competition for this medal shall be con- 
fined to those holding membership in one of the Literary Societies 
and also membership in one of the three highest classes of the 
school, i. e., Sophomore, Junior or Senior, and whose graduation 
u with the class is regarded as practically settled at the time of the 
', contest. The number of contestants and the manner of their 
selection shall be determined by the Faculty. The date of this 
contest shall be during the third week before Commencement. 

The Library Prize Medal.— There will be awarded a $15.00 
Gold Modal for the best declamation given by any student below 



KIRK S VI LLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



36 



the Senior year; but no one shall be admitted to this contest who is 
not regularly enrolled in a Literary Society and in one of the 
graduating classes and whose record at the time of the contest 
does not point with certainty to graduation with his class. The 
date of this contest shall precede that of the oratorical contest; 
but the specific date of the same and the method of selecting the 
contestants shall be determined by the Faculty. 

During the past year three prize medals were awarded: The 
K. M. Ringo Medal for the best oration was won by Mr. Enoch 
Seitz; the W. T. Baird Prize Medal for the best declamation by 
a young lady, by Miss Eloise Duty; the Library Prize Medal, by 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



has been in existence since 1895. Its purpose is to maintain a 
high moral character and in every way to promote Christianity 
among the young men of the school. 

Devotional exercises are held every Sunday afternoon. From 
time to time special missionary meetings are held jointly with 
the Young Women's Christian Association. Classes for a sys- 
tematic study of the Bible meet once a week. 

During the last semester a Y. M. and Y. VY. C. A. reading 
room was fitted up. This room is provided with the best daily 
papers and other choice current literature, and is open on school 
days for the benefit of all students. An information bureau has 
been established with headquarters at the above mentioned read- 
ing room, which is on the second floor of the building. The ob- 
ject of this bureau is to assist new students in securing satisfac- 
tory boarding places, and to give them such information as they 
may desire, also introducing them to friends and rendering them 
various other acts of kindness. 

The Association will conduct a series of excellent lectures 
and musical entertainments at such prices as will be within 
reach of all. Much good was derived from the course the past 
year, and every one was well pleased. The entertainments were 
as follows: Dr. S. P. Henson, "Backbone;" Max Bendix Concert 
Company; Ex-Gov. "Bob" Taylor,- "Love, Laughter and Song;" 
Park Sisters' Concert Company; Dr. Mclntyre, "Buttoned up 
People." 

All letters addressed to President of the Normal Y. M. C. A. 
will receive prompt attention. 



Mr. M. D. Boucher. 




The Young Men's Christian Association of the institution 



36 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION. 

1. Male applicants must be at least 1G and females 15 years 
of age. 

2. Those seeking admission for the first time must present 
satisfactory evidence of good moral character. A letter from 
the county commissioner or persons of well known integrity will 
be sufficient. 

3. Those coming from other institutions of learning must 
submit satisfactory evidence of having been honorably dis- 
charged. . | 

4. Standing obtained recently in High Schools, Academies 
and Colleges on the approved list of the University will be ac- 
cepted by this Institution. f 

5. All students are requested to bring with them their grade 
cards, certificates, diplomas and other documents showing their 
standing in schools heretofore attended by them. These docu- 
ments facilitate the work of classification. t 

"C. Each applicant for enrollment in the School signs a "dec- 
laration of intention to follow the profession of teaching in the 
public schools of the State." 

TWO DAYS FOR CLASSIFICATION. 

The President and the Faculty will be at the Normal School 
building at 8:00 a. m. Monday, September 3rd, and Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 4th, for the purpose of enrolling and classifying students. 
AU resident students are requested to visit the President's office 
, for the purpose of classification on Monday, September 3rd. 
Non-resident students will be expected to reach Kirksville some 
time during the day Monday, September 3rd, an secure their 
boarding places. They should present themselves for classifica- 
tion on Tuesday, September 4th. On Wednesday, September 5th, 
recitations begin and will run on schedule time, 40 to 45 minutes 
for each recitation. 

EXPENSES. 

Expenses are from $25.00 to $40.00 per quarter. This is the 
total cost of board, light, fuel, books and incidental fee for ten 
weeks. Board costs $2.00 to $3.00 per week. This includes fur- ? 
nished room, light and fuel. Good homes in private families can 
always be secured. 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



37 



A great many students rent rooms and board themselves at 
from $1.00 to $2.00 per week. For this purpose either furnished 
or unfurnished rooms can always be secured at comparatively 
low rates. Many of our very best students board themselves or 
board in small groups. 

The tuition is free. There is an incidental fee of $5.00 
for a half term of ten weeks or $8.00 for a semester of 20 weeks. 
The payment of the incidental fee to the Treasurer secures for the 
studeut a right to enter the classes of the institution. In no ease 
will the incidental fee be refunded. 

Students should bring with them all their books for reference 
and for class room use. 

We have from 75 to 80 daily recitations. Students prepared 
to enter the Normal School at all will lind classes adapted to their 
purposes. Persons wishing to engage board or rooms or need- 
ing information of any kind pertaining to the school should ad- ' 
dress the President, Kirksville, Missouri. Ladies coming alone 
will be met at the depot and boarding places found for them if 
they will send notice of the hour of their arrival. 

BEST TIME TO ENTER. 

Students are specially urged to be present at the beginning 
of the year if possible. They thus secure a better understanding 
of the nature of their work. They are more certain of a satis- 
factory classification. Their presence at the beginning con- 
tributes much to the satisfactory arrangement of the program, 
since the program is" made up in view of the wants of those stu- 
dents who are present at the beginning. 

COME TO STAY. 

It is helpful to attend any good school even for a short time; 
but the demand for thoroughly educated teachers is becoming 
very great. Educational agencies are enormously multiplying, 
j Strong, resourceful, scholarly teachers are wanted; desultory, 
piece-meal eduoation can not produce such teachers. Sound edu- 
cation is not made up of chips and whetstones. Lay your plans, 
look ahead. If you are starting to school for the first time come 
to stay all the year. Our best students lay their 'plans reaching 
far into the future so as to attend for a series of years. This is, 
the best way. 



38 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



ARTICULATION WITH THE STATE UNIVERSITY. 

(from catalogue of university.) 

"Graduates of the three State Normal Schools In the ad- 
vanced Latin course of study as recently established will be ad- 
mitted to the University without examination and be permitted 
to enter without condition the Freshman Class in the A. B. and 
B. S. courses in the Academic Department, and the Freshman 
class in Engineering. They may also enter the Departments of 
Law and Medicine, and the School of Agriculture, and the School 
of Mines at Holla. In any course, they may enter as much higher 
than Freshman as in the judgment of the professors their quali- 
fications permit." By recent arrangement our students secure 
advanced standing in several subjects. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

Students are required to comply with the following and with 
such other regulations as the Board of Regents, President and 
Faculty may, from time to time, make known. 

1. Unless excused for cause students are expected to be 
present at all general exercises of the School and must be present 
at every regular recitation and perform faithfully the duties as- 
signed them. 

2. No student shall discontinue a study except for good 
cause of which the Department teacher and the President of the 
Faculty shall be the judges; but the classification of students 
and their re-classification after sickness, absence or other unavoid- 
able causes is strictly within the function of the President. 

3. Students are prohibited from attending billiard rooms, 
pool rooms and other similar places of resort; but during the 
past year it was not necessary to call attention to this rule and it 
is not known that the rule was violated. 

4. Students leaying school without being regularly excused 
by the President will be considered suspended. 

5. All special privileges and excuses granted or required by 
these regulations must be obtained from the President of (ae 
Faculty or from such person or persons as may be designated 
by him. 

SPECIAL DIRECTIONS. 
1. AM books, wraps, hats, caps, over-shoes, umbrellas, etc., 



KIRK8VILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



39 



should be plainly marked by !he owners thereof so as to be known 
wherever found. 

2. The city residence of every student is required at the 
office. In case of change report should be made at once. 

3. Every case of sickness should be reported promptly at the 
office. When any student is taken sick he or she is specially re- 
quested to send word to the office. The President and Faculty 
will thus be able to contribute much to the relief of students. 

4. Reasons for absence from school or from any class are lo 
be presented at the office before entering the class. 

5. Regular Faculty meetings occur at 3:00, p. in., Mondays 
during the school session. Students should arrange their business 
with the Faculty to correspond to this time. 



STATISTICS, 1899-1900, 



Enrollment 

Training School 



Males. 
....372 
. ... 48 



Females. Total. 
370 742 
49 92 



Grand total 



,415 



419 



8^4 



OCCUPATIONS REPRESENTED. 



Prom the farm 

Mercantile pursuits 

Professional other than teaching. 
All others 



,70 per cent. 
,10 per cent. 
.10 per cant. 
.10 per cent. 



LOCALITY. 



Number of counties in First Normal District 

Number of counties in the district represented 

Number of counties outside of the district represented 

Total number of counties represented 

Number of students from Missouri 

Number of students from other states 



44 

38 
7 

45 
722 
20 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Total enrollment of school 

Proportion who defray their own expenses — 
Proportion who have taught before entering, 



*. 834 

.60 per cent. 
.35 per cent. 



ENTERED AND GRADUATED. 



Total number of Alumni 

Total number of graduates in the Elementary course. 
Total number of gr;< luates in alllhe courses 



. 496 
.1,045 
.1.619 



40 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



COUNTIES IN THE DISTRICT REPRESENTED. 



Atchison. 


Gentry. 


Nodaway. 


Audrain. 


Holt. 


Putnam. 


Adair. 


Harrison. 


Pike. 


Boone. 


Howard. 


Platte. 


Buchanan. 


Knox. 


Randolph. 


Chariton. 


Lewis. 


Ray. 


Clark. 


Lincoln. 


Ralls. 


Callaway. 


Linn. 


Schuyler. 


Caldwell. 


Livingston. 


Scotland. 


Carroll. 


Montgomery. 


Shelby. 


Daviess. 


Monroe. 


Sullivan, 


DeKalb. 


Macon. 


Worth. 


Grundy. 


Marion. 





COUNTIES REPRESENTED THAT ARE NOT IN THE DISTRICT. 

Wayne. 



Ca§s. 
Franklin. 
Jefferson 



Illinois. 
Indiana. 
Michigan. 
Mississippi. 



Pettis. 
St. Louis. 

Texas. 

STATES REPRESENTED. 

Missouri. 
Montana. 
Nebraska. 
Ohio. 



Pennsylvania. 
South Dakota. 



Attendance in Normal Department Since Organization. 



TEAR. PUPILS. 

1868— First year 140 

1869— Second year....... 203 

1870— Third year. 3 3 

1871— Fourth year 321 

1872— Fifth year 434 

1873— Sixth year.., 470 

1874— Seventh year C68 

1875— Eighth year 709 

1876— Ninth year 627 

1877— Tenth year f 92 

1878— Eleventh year.. .' 534 

1879— Twelfth year 4G8 

1880— Thirteenth year.... 513 

1881— Fourteenth year 492 

/ 1882— Fifteenth year 4 1 

1883— Sixteenth year 446 

1884— Seventeenth year 501 



TEAR. PUPILS. 

1885— Eighteenth year 475 

1886— Nineteenth year 403 

1887— Twentieth year 421 

1888— Twenty-first year 490 

1889— Twenty-second year 505 

1890— Twenty-third year 520 

1891— Twenty-fourth year 560 

1892— Twenty-fifth year 596 

1893— Twenty-sixth year 606 

1894— Twenty-seventh year 562 

1895— Twenty-eighth year 620 

1896— Twenty-ninth yt ar 623 

1897— Thirtieth year 719 

1898— Thirty-first year 737 

1899— Thirty-second year.. 739 

1900— Thirty-third year 742 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



41 



ALUMNI. 



OFFICERS OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

C. S. BROTHER, President. 

J. SHELBY MADDOX, Vice-President 

IDA FINNEGAN, Secretary and Treasurer. . 
I 

POST-GRADUATES 

DEGREE— MASTER OP SCIENTIFIC DIDACTICS. 

1874— ^-*0. P. Davis. 

1875— *W. E. Coleman, W. N. Doyle, 0. B. Daughters, J. 0. 

Stevens. 

1876— J. "••U. Barnard, W. H. Baker, 0. W. Bigger, Thomas 0. 

Oloyd, J. M. White. 

1878— J. E. Chandler, Ada C. Oldham, C. W. Thomas. 

1879— Jennie Burton, G. W. Oullison, Ella Carothers (Mrs. Dunne- 

gan) W. T. Carrington, N. B. Henry, Maggie Thomp- 
son (Mrs. Henry), E. E. Hollipeter, R. S. lies, A. R. Orr, 
W; H. Vaughn. j 

1880— John Barton, Julia Lester (Mrs. Bosworth), Manlove Hall, 

John R. Kirk, Lowa Phelps (Mrs. Murdy), F. P. Primm, 
Thos. E. Sublett, Serelda Gilstrap (Mrs. Thomas). 

1881— J 0. Dooly, *S. D, Eilis, C. L. Ebaugh, H. MeGarry, *0. M. 

Polley, G. A. Smith. 

1882— A. B. Carroll, J. A. Glittery, J. S. McGhee, I. N. Matlick, 

Flo. Northup (Mrs. Scheurer), Duke hi, Wright (Mrs. 
Herron), W. E. Tipton, A. B. Warner. 

1883— T. S. Cox, C. F. Foster, W. B. Holloway, Lulu Sharp (Mrs. 

Corley). t , : ., ^ 

1884— W. B. Anderson, Olivia Baldwin, S. A. Conway, F. W. 

Guthrie, Charles Higgle, R. R. Steele. 

1885— Cora Baldwin, Seldon Sturges. 
1888— H. O. Long. 

1889. Aven Nelson. 

1892— Wm. D. Grove,, Mary Trimble Prewitt, F. A. Swanger. 

1893— Adaline Bell, Frank Wisdom Hannah, Marguerite Pumph- 

rey (Mrs. Smith , Walter H. Payne, Louise M. Trimble, 
John A. Whiteford. 

1894— R. B. Arnold, G. W, Bowen, Fannie Gentry (Mrs. Lobban). 
1896— Minnie Bra shear, W. L. Riggs, J. H. Grove, J. H. Kooutz, 



Kirksville 
.Columbia 
Kirksville 



42 



1897— Fanny K. McCoy, Sophia 0. Watson. 

1899— Z. Fletcher Wharton. 

1900— A. B. Coffee, Geo. M. Laughlin, G. W. Pendergraft, A. P. 

Vaughn, Annie M. Wood. 
♦Deceased. 

GRADUATES. 

DEGREE — BACHELOR OP SCIENTIFIC DIDACTICS. 

1872— W. N. Doyle, *0. P. Davis, W. F. Drake, I. N. Matlick, 

♦Vincent Stine, J. T. Smith, Sheldon Sturges, J. O. 
Stevens. 

1873— C. W. Bigger, *W. E. Coleman, C. B. Daughters. 

1874— W. H. Baker, J. U. Barnard, G. W. Cullison, Thomas C. 

Cloyd, Sue Forsythe (Mrs. Eaton), Helen M. Hallibur- 
ton (Mrs. McReynolds), Julia Lester (Mrs. Bos worth), 
♦Emma Thompson (Mrs. Hannah), J. M. White. 

1875— J. R. Bradley, Jennie Burton, B. T. Hardin, R. S. lies, *A. 

H. Jamison, J. S. McGhee, J. S. McPhail, A." R. Orr, 
F. P. Primm, Lizzie Roe (Mrs. Carpenter), C. W. 
Thomas, Alta R. Westcott (Mrs. McLaury). 

1876— John Barton, J. F. Chandler, Sallie O. Callaway (Mrs. 

Larkins), W. T. Carrington, W. B. Ferrill, N. B. Henry, 
E. S. Harpham, E. O. Larkins, Ada C, Oldham, Lovva 
Phelps (Mrs. Murdy), H. C. Rutherford, ♦Minnie Smoot, 
O. M. Thompson, Maggie Thompson (Mrs. Henry). 

1877— Ella Carothers (Mrs. Dunnegan), Irene Gumberlan, Serelda 

Gilstrap (Mrs. C. W. Thomas), E. E. Ilollipeter, W. 1). 
Oldham, R. V. Seward, W. H. Vaughn. E. H. Walker. 

1878— Anna Baldwin (Mrs. G. W. Sublette), J. C. Dooiey, ♦S. D. 

Ellis, Charles L. Ebaugh, *H. A. Fink, Rebecca E. 
Hubbell, Manlove Hall, John R. Kirk, H. McGarry, *0. 
M. Polly, G. W. Sublette, Thomas E. Sublette. 

1879— W. B. Baker, Cora B. Baldwin (Mrs. Hastan), A. O. Daman, 

Addie M. Green (Mrs. Britton), Rice Knox, R. E. Old- 
ham, C. P. Perham, G. A. Smith, A. B. Warner, Z. F. 
1 Wharton, 

1880— 1. F. Atterbury, "Olivia A. Baldwin, A. B. Carroll, C. E. Fos- 

ter, J. A. Glittery, T. L, Herbert, H. Johnson, Flora 
Northup (Mrs. Scheurer), ♦S. H. Soper, W. E. Tipton, 
Eimonia D. Wright (Mrs. Herron). 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



43 



1881— W. B. Anderson, T. S. Cox, Ada M. Greenwood (Mrs. Mc- 

Laughlin), E. H. Hatch, W. R. Holloway, W. F. Link, 
R. B. Louden, L. S. Mitchell, 11. B\ Sallee, D. D. Sayer, 
Lulu B. Sharp (Mrs. Corley). 

1882— J. O. Allison, Nellie Bagg (Mrs. Glaize), S. A. Conway, Ida 

Prankland, W. F. Guthrie, J. L. Holloway, J. W. Jones, 
0. Higgle, xt. 11. Steele. 

1883— J. S. Erwin, Annie Dysart, Aven Nelson, L. I. Owen (Mrs. 

Mitchell), J. N. Peinberton, Mary T. Prewett, Lottie 
r Spencer (O'Neil). 

1884— R. W. Barrow, J. D. Brown, B. F. Carroll, S. A. Crook- 

shanks, Miriam Davis (Mrs. Mitchell), Mary Griffith, 
J. H. Grove, J. F. Holliday, R. E. Johnson, H. 0. Long, 
W. H. Miller, Libbie K. Miller (Mrs. Traverse), Carrie 
Randall (Mrs. Thwing), IT. B. Shain, Mamie Sharp (Mrs. 
Simpson), F. A. Swanger, Nettie Willard (Mrs. Hovey) 

1885— R. B. Arnold, R. E. Barnard, N. M. Boyd, C. 0. Childress, 

Silas Dinsmoor, W. W. Griffith, W. D. Grove, Mary 
Howell (Mrs. Finnegan), Allie Link (Mrs. Whitacre), 
O. M. Mitchell, F. M. Patterson, Fannie Riggs (Mrs. 
' Long), Isom Roberts, J. J. Steele. 
188G— S. P. Bradley, A. J. Bradsher, J. J. Brummett, Jennie Ed- 
wards, Ella Evans, Kate Funk (Mrs. Simpson), Nannie 
Garrett, Fannie Graer (Mrs. J. W. Mcrtin), G. M. Holli- 
day, Etta L. Johnson (Mrs. Kiggins), A. E. Kennedy, 
C. M. Kiggins, May L. Northcutt (Mrs. Locke), L. M. 
Phipps, Stacey G. Porter (Mrs. Miller), W. T. Porter, 
A. L. Pratt, J. F. Pratt, *I. A. Price, J. A. Pulliam, 
Paul Sanford, J. M. Simpson, Minnie Smith (Mrs. Fow- 
ler), T. J. Updyke, J. J. Watson, J. D. Wilson. 

1887— G, Bellamy, Adaline Bell, Charles Cornelius, Mollie Cham-' 

bliss, W. B. Edwards, Andrew Erickson, G. W. Fisher, 
Georgia Funk (Mrs. Meyers), Ella Funk, Mattie Han- 
nah (Mrs. Humphreys), U. G. Humphreys, A. L. Holli- 
day, W. L. Holloway, G. E. Jamison, Nannie Key (Mrs. 
Dufur), Eugene C. Link, E. D. Luckey* C. K. McCoy, 
Geo. F. Nason, Marguerite Pumphrey (Mrs. Smith), Bell 
Plumb, Walter A. Payne, Ella Rolofson, Laura Seals, 
♦Ida Thompson (Mrs. Price). 

1888— E. E. Barnett, H. S. Bruce, Mollie Chancellor, E. L. Cooley, 

Lisse Funk, George R. Funk, Sallie Gex (Mrs. Roberts), 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



H. C. Harvey, Morgan EC. McCall, Fannie Mackoy, A. 
L. McKenzie, Lulu Patterson, Marie W. Patterson, D. 
L. Roberts, Prudie liisdon (Mrs. Tillery), Mollie Reed 
(Mrs. Cooley), Minnie Reed, S. M. Suodgrass, Alma 
Smith (Mrs. J. B. Dodson), *Pauline C. R. Stone (Mrs. 
Rozelle), Eva White. 

1889— Isabel Ellison (Mrs. Vinsonhaler), Wm. Eiring, Fannie 

Heald, G. W. Hainan, Frank Hannah, E. T. Hubbard, 
Genie Nolan, George H. Owen, Lucy Patterson (Mrs. 
Motter), W. L. Riggs, Ella Woods, W. W. Walters. 

1890— J. T. Aldridge, Emma Ammerman, O. W. Bowen, Julia B. 

Ellison (Mrs. Hill), Charles Eiring, Fannie Gentry (Mrs. 
Lobban), Sue Greenleaf, George Gex, Niua Heald (Mrs. 
McClure), Lizzie Harvey, Emma Poe, Adelia Richmond, 
Louise M. Tremble, John A. Whiteford, Emily Watson. 

1891— Geo. Finley Burton, E. O. Doyle, G. P. Guthrie, Jennie 

Green, Mary Gerard, J. G. Hennon, Kate Hammond, 
•V Lillian H. Heald (Mrs. Richmond), Blanche Heiny, W. 

A. Muir, Rosa Patterson (Mrs. West), J. E. Petree, 
Allie Ross (Mrs. Suggett), Ida Stafford (Mrs. Geo. F. 
Burton, C. A. Savage. 

1892— Catherine Allen, Minnie Brashear, Ruby Dorothy Bowen, 

. Jennie E. Cole, Robert Lee Eberts, Nellie Mathilda 
Evans, Thomas Alonzo Hays, Cassandra Emma Hub- 
bard, Evan Richard Jones, Mattie May McCall, Louis 
Edward Petree, Geo. Arthur Radford, Oliver Stigall, 
♦Caddie Smith, Lundy Byron Smith, Lida Athleen 
Shultz, Ellen Eliza Van Home, Sophia Campbell Wat- 
son, Anna Stafford Western. 

1893— Charles Bagg, Delia Baird, L. Alice Bond (Mrs. Christie), 

Clarence Alva Blocher, *Margaret Crawford, Aflie 
Davis, Mae DeWitt (Mrs. Hamilton), Martha DeWitt, 
Emeline Fee, Meade Ginnings, Benjamin F. Guthrie, 
Mamie Harrington (Mrs. Schwartz), -.Ruth Jeffers, 
James Alva Koontz, Chas. Murphy, John R. Music, 
John Davis Marr, Camille Nelson, Henry E. Patterson, 
Calvin H. Paul, J. T. Ronald, Althea Ringo. 

1894— Geo. Washington Atterbery, Hubbard Blair, Wm. 1\ Batch- 

elar, Mary Porter Burk, Alice Elzira Downing, Warren 
Mitchell Duffle, William Samuel Eller, Lena Edelen, 
Julia Emma Freeland, Mary Marguerite Fisher, Ben- 



KIRKSNILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



45 



jamin Franklin Gordon, Lina Gore, George Mark 
Laugblin, Francis Marion Motter, Sadie Martin, John 
Wilfley Oliver, Martha Owen, William Charles Thomp- 
son, Lena Minerva Trowbridge, Annie Woods. 

1895— Fred William Alexander, James Perry Boyd, Thomas Austin 

Craighead, Enoch Marvin Drinkard, Samuel Rodgers 
Dillman, Alva Erastus Dowell, Dorothea Caroline Fon- 
canon, Ezra Clarence Grim, Jessie Bird Hatcher, Katie 
Bell Hawkins, Anna C. Hill (Mrs. Wright), Louis In- 
gold, Lyda McKay, Frances Miller, Joe Shelby Maddox, 
James Thomas McGee, John Henry Nolen, Maud Owen, 
Fred Benjamin Owen, Gertrude Phillips, Lena Lucile 
Storm, Ambrose Dudley Veatch, Julia Alberta Ward- 
ner. 

1896— Frank Buckner, Ida Brashear, Manville Carothers, Jennie 

Dodson, Maggie Furtney, August Harman, Edward E. 
Huffman, Homer A. Higgins, J. A. Hook, Arthur Lee, 
Mabel Mennie, George Byron Novinger, Louise Rex, 
Ledrew Esper Ryals, Nell Stone, Zorada Snelling, Ar- 
thur T. Sweet, S. E. Seaton. 

1897— W, S. Boyd, John 0. Bobne, P. E. Burns, C. C. Blue, E. 0. 

Bohon, Aida Evans, Fred Fair, E. E. Funk, Mayme 
Foncanon, Harry Green, J. L. Gallatin, Myrtle Harlan, 
Ada Harlan, " Frank Heiny, Frank Hoefuer, Virginia 
' Holderman, Essie Holmes, Eugene Lake, O. W. Mur- 
phy, Milton McMurry, H. Nesse, Martha Petree, Vic- 
tor Parrish, O. A. Petree, *McDonald Petree, F. H. 
Potter, Nora Phillips, G. W. Pendergraft, Saida Rags- 
dale, Carrie Reynolds, A. H. Smith, Lilah Townsend, 
E. S. Terpenning, A. P. Vaughn, W. I. Woodson. 

1898— Amy Bown, Claude S. Brother, Ardelia Dockery, Sallle 

Davis, Mae Evans, A. D. Foster, A. S. Faulkner, Kate 
Holdsworth, Hattie Lyon, R. N. Linville, J. D. Luther, 
O. H. Lind, Birdie Miller, Julia McBeth, Lilly North- 
cutt, Anna Pile, Albert Pratt, Ethel Ringo, Mary Sulli- 
van, W. E. Shirley, Ray Seitz, W. B. Thornburg. 

1899— Cordelia Ashlock, Pansy Bowen, Delos Austin Bragg, Cora 

C. Buchanan, Gwyn H. Baker, Ellen J. Crockett, Lottie 
Christine, Lida Corken, Ada Cainahan, John A. De- 
Tienne, Jean Eames, Ida May .Finegan, Mabel Gibbons, 
J. A. Goodwin, Oscar Ingold, Wm. Horace Ivie, Mayme 



46 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



Lorenz, Bess Hannah Link, Zoa McDowell, G. W. 
, Pauly, Mrs. Lena Pauly, .Julia Louise Porter, Jessie 
Ray, Frank K. Surbeek, E. Claude Smith, John B. Sti- 
gall, Nannie Thomas, Britt Payne Taylor, Jus, Horn- 
buckle Turner. 
♦Deceased. 

Note— Twenty-nine classes have graduated from the full 
course of this Institution. The Alumni number -190. Their 
homes are in all states and countries. It has seemed impossible 
to keep trace of them. So much complaint has been made dur- 
ing the past year on account of inaccuracies in the list of names 
and addresses that It is now decided to publish only the names 
and make no effort to give the addresses of the Alumni for the 
present. During the coming year, the President of the School 
and the . officers of the Alumni Association will make a mighty 
effort to recover the addresses of all members of the Association 
and issue a correct list, if possible, in the next catalogue. Dur- 
ing the past few years the organization of the Alumni Associa- 
tion has been pretty nearly a dead letter. It is the purpose of the 
officers of the Association to give such a program next year as 
•will bring a large attendance Commencement Week. To this end 
the President of the School and the Faculty will lend all possible 
assistance. 

SENIOR CLASS, GRADUATING JUNE 14, 1900. 

Adams, Alice. Hill, Essie. 

♦Anderson, Susan Luella. * Jenkins, Vida.< 



♦Baker, Florence. 
Barnes, Susie. 
Bohrer, E. Grace. 
Bovard, Genevieve. 
Carmack, J. A. 
Caskey, Adah Blanche. 5 
Cochrane, W. Lemuel. 
Dockery, Leota Lillian. 
Dougherty, Joseph C. 
Evans, Ella. 
Foncanon, Alice. 
Gipson, E. H. 
Hall, Blanche. 



Jones, Roxana Howard. 

Kirk, Thos. J. 

Laughlin, Harry H. 

Lemon, N. June. 

Lemon, Sadie, 

♦Livesay, Bessie Marie. 
"Long, Emma. 

Martin, Elsie Mae. 

McMurry, N. F. 
• Miller, Mary. 

♦Moorman, J. C. 

Mills, Myra. 

Northcutt, May E. 



Hamilton, Robt. Emmet. Pemberton, Walker S. 

Hendricks, Davella. ♦Powell, Lida. 

Heyd, Jacob Wilhelm. Roberts, Sunie. 

♦Permitted to do a semester's work in one 
.summer school ind on satisfactory completion of 
• August 4, 1900. 



Rombauer, Mathilde B. 
Scott, Elea B. 
Shantz, Rose A. 
Smith, Rosa May. 
Stone, Stella. 
Sansberry, P. O. 
Talbot, Mary A. 
Turner, James Harrison. 
Urban, Fred W. 
Urban, William C. 
Vaughn, Jessie B. 
Webber,--Inez. 
Westrope, Sadie. 
White, Virginia Louise. 
Wilkes, Lena. 
♦Wbitacre, E. S. 



subject or two subjects in 
the same to receive diploma 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL. CHOOL. 



47 



SOPHOMORE CLASS, 1900. 



Abplaiialp, Tra S. 

J^danis, Perry. 

Adams, Muttie B. • 

Arnold, S. W. 

Ashby, Elizabeth. 

13aer, Leone Cass. 

Baldridge, J. Sumner. 

Ballinger, Zula A. 

Beardsley, W. V. 

Bledsoe, W. Henry. 

Blacklock. David E. 

Bondurant, Olney. 

Boyes, M. A. 

Braden, Homer. 

Bridges, D. G. 

*Biown, T. A. 

Buck, Frank E. 

Carrico, Maynie„ 

Cauthorn, W. E. 

Cleaveland, Anie Keller. 

Cook, William Henry. 

Couch, Isaac P. 

Cox, Lucien. 

Daniel, Joe A. 

Daniel, W. O. 

Day, Rubie Vera. 

DeTienne,, BY B. 

Dickson, Charles E. 

Dodson, Winnie. 

Downing, O. V. 

Douglas, Prank C. 

Duty, Eloise. 

Duty, Mabel Gray. 

Eastman, P. W. 

Erwin, Alice. 
JFarmer, Ethel Vivian. 

•Punk, Carrie Edna. 
•Gardner, R. L. , 



Gooden, Josiah. 
Gooden, Naoini. _ { 
Gray, Grace. 
Hall, Harry D. 
Helley, Olivia M. 
Heryford, Chas. A. 
Hougland, M. M. 
Hodges, C. W. 
Holland, Anna. 
Holloway, Russell E. 
Howell, Nannie. 
Hausam, Wm. 
Hull, Braxie. 
Hutcheson, Verna. 
Irubler, Henry. 
Imbler, L. J. 
Imbler, Thomas Warreu. 
Johnson, Elmer A. 
Johnson, Louise. 
Kennen, Maud M. 
Kerr, Nelson. 
Keyte, I. A. 

*Kinlon, William Parmer 
Lafferty, Rosabel. 
Leatherwood, W. E. 
Loftis, Dessie Rosetta. 
Lumpkin, Mabel Edna. 
Markey, Minnie. 
Markland, R. V. 
Mathis, Mary. 
McQuoid, Essie. 
Meehan, D. W. 
Meek, Bell. 
Miller, Clara. 
Miller, Mabel. 
Morelock, E W. R. 
Morris, Thos. A. 
Morrey, Sarah Elizabeth. 



Morrow, Marie. 
Mullius, W. S. 

McGee, P. L. 
Noviuger, E. Leroy. 
Omer, Puss, 
Fennock, Crosby B. I 
Pierce, J. A. 
*Pe\v, Emniett. 
Hiley, tyi E. ' ' 
Kisdon; Audrey Delos. 
Ruggks, Clara L. 
Sanborn, Roy W. 
Scott, Lillian. 
Schooling L. P. 
See, Kittie N. 
Severe:, Evelyn P. 
Shumate, Maude. 
*Simms, Nell N. 
Smith, Albert P. 
Smith, Georgia." 
Smith, Alfle. * 
Smoot, Isadore. 
Smoot, Lelia. 
Small, W. L. 
Snidow, Antonia. 
Somerville, Glen A. 
Spicer, D. C. 
Springer, Margaret E. 
Steiner, W. L. 
♦Stephen, Margaret J. 
Sparling, Martha E. 
Tanner, B. P. 
Thompson, Leonard M. 
Taylor, Mrs. Anna Ross. 
Wells, Bessie F. 
♦Y^illiams, W. M. 
Wilhite, Alma, 



♦Permitted to take a semester's work in one subject or two subjects in 
summer school and on completion of same to receive certificate. August 4, 1900. 



48 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



PUPILS OF THE TRAINING SCHOOL. 



FIRST GRADE. 



BOYS. 

Burton, Stanley. 
Bailey, Leland. 
Cornelius, Evans. 
Cupp, Gall. 
Fahringer, Ernest. 
Garrison, Roy. 
Grant, Richard. 
Link, Virgil. 
Sruythe, Carl. 
Tenant, Carl. 
Willows, Harris. 



GIRLS. 

Bramblette, Dora. 
Crowder, Hazel. 
Cornelius, Christina. 
Lund, Florence. 
Ronibauer, Theluaa. 
Starr, Lucllc. 
Urech, Bonnie. 
Wilson, Lucile. 



Costolow, Everett. • 
Mansfield, Bernard. 
Martin, Howard. 



SECOND GRADE. 

GIRLS. 

Bragg, Marie. 
Branscom, Jessie. 
Bramblette, Lenore. 
Duteher, Mary. 
Kirk, Mary. 
Kirk, Pauline. 
* Powell, Bulah. 
Ransom, Mabel. 
Tenant, Edna. 
Teverbaugh, Hazel. 

THIRD AND FOURTH GRADES. 



Beatty, Byron. 
Hull, Noel. 
Landis, Orrin. 



Bowman, Irene. 
Carothers, Edith. 
Dodson, Olva. 
Forbes, Lorena. 
Hensley, Gertrude. 
McAlpin, Vesta. 
Powell, Louise. ... 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



FIFTH AND SIXTH GRADES. 



BOYS. 
Allabach, Lazarus. 
Bramblette, Buford. 
Carothers, Carl. 
Costolow, Albert. 
Davis, Errett. 
Dewell, Paul. 
Graham, Carl. 
Kirk, Victor. 
Miller, Carroll. 
McAlpin, Claud, 
jj McCall. Erwin. 
Proctor, Heath. 
Swearingen, Waldo. 
Wilson, Forest. 



BOYS. 

Brown, Marcie. 
Kitselman, Harry. 
Ownby, Ben. 
Parrish, Clarence. 
Starr, Aura. 
Sackett, Arthur. 



GIRLS. 

Anderson, Okie. 
Craig, Carrie. 
Dodson, Byon. 
Eberhardt, Vera. 
Kieth, Clara. 



SEVENTH GRADE. 



GIRLS. 
Bramblette, Mattie. 
Beatty, Mary. 
Doneghy, Dagmar. 
Dutcher, Marie. 
Mclntyre, Mabel. 
Martin, Ruth. 
Proctor, Ruth. 
Roberts, Cora. 
Ransom, Ethel. 
Sneed, Ula. 
Willows, Daisy. 
Tinsman, May. 

EIGHTH GRADE. 

The members of this class having completed the work of the Training 
School are to be admitted next year to the Normal School classes. 



Bledsoe, Earl. 
Bramblette, Otis. 
Doneghy, Thomas. 
Keyte, Willie. 
Smoot, Charlie. 
Sigler, Vane. 



Bramblette, Belva. 
Meeks, Hazel. 
Miller, Dora. 
McReynolds, Leila. 
Moyer, Bulah. 
Noe, Minnie. 
Smith, Cleva. 



4 



50 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



LIST OF STUDENTS OF 1899-1900, WITH RE-CLASSI- 
FICATION FOR 1900-1901. 

(This re-classiflcatlon is believed to be very nearly correct. If it con- 
tains any errors they will be corrected when students present themselves for 
re-entrance). 



SENIORS. 



♦Adams, Alice '. .Kirksville 

Adams, Claude B Higbee 

Adams, Mattie Kirksville 

Allen, Effa Memphis 

♦Anderson, Lena E Kirksville 

Arnold, S. W Energy 

Bailey, Myrtle Elsbcny 

Baker, Edna Kirksville 

♦Baker, Florence Kirksville 

♦Barnes, Susie Tarkio 

♦Bohrer, Grace Monroe 

Boue, Vera J Lodi, 111. 

♦Bovard, Genevieve Maryville 

Brewer, Basil Kirksville 

♦Carmack, J. A Milan 

♦Caskey, Adah Kirksville 

Cleaveland, Artie Monticello 

♦Cochrane, W. S Moulton, la. 

Crockett, G. R Hamilton 

♦Dockery, Leota Kirksville 

♦Dougherty, J. C Cairo 

Earhart, Anna Kirksville 

Eaton, C. V Shclbyvllle 

Erwin, Alice Houston 

♦Evans, Ella Maryville 

Evans, T. M Kirksville 

Fair, Eugene Blue Ridge 

Floyd, Nora Kirksville 

♦Foncanon, Alice .1 Kirksville 

Forsythe, Daisy Kirksville 

Gilhousen, Mabel Kahoka 

Gill, Alta Kirksville 

♦Glpson, E. H. Lagonda 

Greenwood, Mary C Kirksville 

♦Hall, Blanche Kirksville 

Hall, Frank Edlna 

Hall, Wannee Gait 

♦Hamilton, R. E Kirksville 

Hawkins, G. L Hematite 

♦Hendricks, Davella. . .Monroe City 

Hennon, Vena Kirksville 

Heryford, C. A: Hale 

♦Heyd, J. W Kirksville 

♦Hill, Essie Holliday 

Hull, Braxie Kirksville 

Ingrum, Marie Belton 

♦Jenkins, Vida E Harris 

♦Jones, Roxie .Boynton 

Kerr, Nelson ...Edgerton 



SENIORS. 



♦Laughlin, H. H Kirksville 

♦Lemon, Nell Clearniont 

♦Lemon, Sadie Clcarmout 

♦Livesay, Bessie Paris 

♦Long, Emma Kirksville 

Lorenz, Alta Kirksville 

♦Martin, Elsie Mae Troy 

McGee, F. L Young's Creek 

McKay, E. A Knox City 

♦McMurry, N. F Kirksville 

♦Miller, Mary Memphis 

♦Mills, Myra Kirksville 

Mitchell, T. M Renick 

♦Moorman, J. C Maryvilla 

Nicholas, Susan Kirksville 

♦Northcutt, May Knox City 

Oliver, A. R Wellsville 

♦Pemberton, W. S Armstrong 

Petree, Lettie Kirksville. 

Petree, Nora Kirksville 

Porter, Mary E Kirksville 

♦Powell, Lyda Mexico 

' Reedal, Erma G Kirksville 

v Reed, Minnie Millard 

Riggs, N. R Lawson 

♦Roberts, Sumie Carrolltoa 

♦Rombauer, JMathilde Kirksville 

Sanborn, Roy W Kirksville 

♦Sansberry, P. O Queen City 

♦Scott, Elea B Monticello 

Seitz, E. B Richmond, Ind. 

♦Shantz, Rose A. .Brownsville, Neb. 

Six, B. P Kirksville 

♦Smith, Rosa May Monroe City 

♦Stone, Stella Paris 

Stringer, Geo. J Humphreys 

♦Talbot, Mary Fayelte 

Taylor, J. A Novelty 

♦Turner, J. H Goldsberry 

♦Urban, Fred W Stewartsville 

♦Urban, W. C Stewartsville 

♦Vaughn, Jessie Paris 

♦Webber, Inez ';• Brock 

♦Westrope, Sadie Chillicothe 

Whitacre, Ed. S Kirksville 

♦White, Virginia Ki-ksvllle 

♦Wilkes, Lena Kirksville 

Willard, Mamie Kirksville 

Witmer, Bessie Kirksville 



♦Seniors of 18.^-1900. 

Notb — At time of going to press 102 are enrolled in the Summer School. 
Their names ami classification will be given in the next catalogue. 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



I JUNIORS. 



Abplanalp, I, S ..Denver 

Adams, Perry Kirksvllle 

Anderson, Mabel ..Kirksvllle 

Ashby, Elizabeth Hurdland 

Baer, Leone Cass 1 Kirksvllle 

Baker, J. B Kirksville 

Baldridge, J. Summer Newtown 

Ballinger, Zula Kirksville 

Barker, Ray Kirksville 

Beardsley, W. V Kirksville 

Beck, Roy L Gamma 

Bennett, Frank ....Jackson, Mich. 

Bennett, G. F Chatsworth 

Blacklock, D. E.. King City 

Bledsoe, Henry Kirksville 

Bledsoe, Willis Queen City 

Bondurant, Olney Bethany 

Boucher, M. D Cairo 

Boyes, M. A .Auxvasse 

Braden, Homer Jamesport 

Brewer, Jessie Kirksville 

Bridges, D. G Denver 

Browning, H. B Molino 

Browning, J. J Molino 

Brown, T. A Trenton 

Buck, Frank E Lacrosse 

Carrico, Mayme Cross Keys 

Cash, Courtney Frankford 

Cauthorn, Wm Molino 

Cook, W. H Sidney 

Coppers, A. F.. Kenwood 

Couch, I. F .. . Westville 

Cox, L. M Cox 

Cunningham^ Mary Madison 

Dance, G. N Tolona 

Daniel, Joe Maud 

Daniel, W. O Maud 

Day, Ruble V , Cairo 

Delaney, Guss Hurdland 

DeTienne, F. B Vandalla 

Dickson, C. E Kirksville 

Dodson, Winnie J... Kirksville 

Douglas, F. C Venice 

Downing, C. V.... ...Kirksville 

Drinkard, Ethel Kirksville 

Djity, Eloise Peakeville 

Duty, Mabel G .Peakeville 

Eastman, F. W .... Winston 

Farmer, Ethel Middletown 

Finegan, Retta Kirksville 

Foster, G. P Haseville 

Funk, Edna ...Kirksville 

Gardner, R. L Dudley, la. 

Gooden, Cora Kirksville 

Gooden, Josiah Kirksville 

Gooden, Naomi Kirksville 

Gooden, Wm Kirksville 

Gray, Grace Parnell City 

Griffin, Alice Kirksville 

Griffin, Nellie Kirksvllle 

Hall, H. D Woodlawn 

Hamilton, Elsie Kirksville 

Hargis, J. F Lancaster 

Harrington, Martha .... .Kirksville 
Harris, Ollie .Burton 



JUNIORS. 

Hausam, Wm Stewurtsvllle 

Heluy, J. D Kirksville 

Helley, Olivia New Haven 

Hennon, C. L Kirksville 

Heyd, Frank Kirksvllle 

Hodges, C. W UnlonvlUe 

Holland, Anna Callao 

Holloway, R. E Roweiia 

Hopewell, Lula Kirksville 

Hougland, M. M Elgin 

Howell, Nannie Maysville 

Hutcheson, Verna Kirksville 

Imbler, H. D Kirksvllle 

Imbler, L. J Kirksville 

Imbler, T. W Kirksville 

James, Geo. Lucerne 

Johnson, Elmer A Kirksville 

Johnson, Louisa Kirksville 

Kennen, Maud Laddonta 

Keyte, I. A Kirksville 

Kinion, W. P Catnsville 

Lafferty, Rosa Middletown 

Leatlurwood, W. H 

Loftiss, Dessie Kirksville 

Lumpkin, Mabel Jamesport 

Mathis, Mary Stevener, Mont. 

May, Helen Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Mclntyre. Ida Kirksville 

McLain, W. M Williamstown 

McQuoid, Essie Rutletlge 

Means, R. O Clarksdale 

Meehan, D. W Lewiston 

Meek, Bell Weatberby 

Miller, Clara Greentop 

Miller, Mabel Queen City 

Mills, Carrie Kirksville 

Morelock, Daisy Stahl 

Morelock, Raymond Stahl 

Morrey, Elizabeth Bucklin 

Morris, T. A Wiuigan 

Morrow, Marie Kirksville 

Mullins, W. S Omaha 

Newton, Bert Macon 

Novinger, C. L Stahl 

Omer, Puss Kirksvi le 

Pennock, Crosby ..Lansdowne, Pa. 

Pew, Emmett Middletown 

Pierce, J. A La Bi lie 

Riley, W. E... La Plata 

Risdon, A. D Kirksvllle 

Rodgers, Ethel Judson 

Rudasill, Lucy Hollensville 

Ruggles, Clara Duncan's Bridge 

Rule, Lena Nashua 

Sands, Effie ..Brashear 

Schooling, L. P,.... Mobcrly 

Scott, Lillian Montlcello 

Scott, Ora V Osaka 

See, Kittie Grunvilla 

Severe, Eva Catnsville 

Shoop, Bertha Sibley's Point 

Shumate, Maud Amity 

Sickels, Bell . Vaudnlta 

Sims, Nelle Milan 

Small. W. L ..Futrfut 



52 



KIRKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



JUNIORS. 

Smith, A. P., Anabel 

Smith, Alfle Kirkavillo 

Smith, Georgia Kirksville 

Smoot, Isadora .....Kirksville 

Smoot, Lelia Downing 

Snidow, Antonla ...........Madison 

Somerville, Glen A..., Milan 

Sparling, Martha Kirksville 

Spicer, D. C Filrnore 

Springer, Elizabeth ....Decatur, la. 

Steiner, Wm ...New Haven 

Stelle, Jas M.. Taylorville, 111. 



JUNIORS. 

Stephen, Margaret J Peakcsvllle 

Tanner, B. F Lennox, S. D. 

Taylor, Mrs. Anna Novelty- 
Thompson, Leonard Osborne 

Townsend, Jennie Kirksville 

Tumuiond, Lela Kirksville 

Tyler, J. W Kirksville 

Walker, Cora .L Kirksville 

Wells, Bessie Huidland 

Wllbite, Alma Rocheport 

Williams, W. M Benbow 



SOPHOMORES. 

AtfamB, N. A Rutledge 

Allen, G. C Memphis 

• ; ' Alverson, R. d Strother 

Atkinson, C. A Knox City 

Baldridge, Bessie Kirksville 

, Baltzell, J. E Deer Ridge 

Beecher, Carrie Millard 

Bishoff, Margaret Coin, la. 

Black, May B Adair 

Bowman, Pearle Kirksville 

- Bowman, Zella M Kirksville 

-"""Brown, Fleta C Kirksville 

Broyles, Galen Kirksville 

Buchanan, C. C Kirksville 

Burton, W. B Firth 

Carter, C. L Hallsville 

Carter, Elmer Hatfield 

Carter, Ethylene C Kirksville 

Chappell, Leona Kirksville 

Clark, B. A Kirksville 

Cole, Eliza , Kirksville 

Cole, R. S Kirksville 

Collins, Bash Trenton 

Conner, Willia Sublette 

Crabtree, Dollye Kirksville 

Daniel, Iva M.... Maud 

Darr, S. P , Browning 

Davis, Bert Kirksville 

Dodson, Fannie J Kirksville 

Doneghy, R. P Kirksville 

% Dralle, Fred W.. La Belle 

Eaton, Anna M Shelbina 

Elder, W. D .'.Peakesville 

Eubank, E. C... Mount Airy 

Evans, Bertha ...........Kirksville 

Evans, Margaret .........Kirksville 

Finch, Jennie Kirksville 

Gooding, C. J Macon 

Greenley, Anna Hedge City 

Griffin, J. W Kirksville 

Griggs, R. E Hedge City 

Handlon, L. I .Acasto 

Hawkins, Edna ....Hematite 

Heaton. J. D Ethel 

Heiny, Agnes Kirksville 

H Heyd, Carrie Kirksville 

, Holloway, Mabel Queen City 

Holtzclaw, Arthur Higbee 

Horn, I. M Wyconda 

Howley, Delia Kirksville 



SOPHOMORES. 

Hull, L. C Kirksville 

Humphrey, D. W Hurdland 

Irwin, E. S Lewtstovvn 

Ivie, Emma Kirksville 

Kelley, Thos. T Memphis 

Keyte, Lena Kirksville 

King, W. N Skinner 

Kirk, Lester Mt. Carmel 

Langford, J. L Kirksville 

Langford, Lenna Kirksville 

Lemon, H. A Clenrmont 

Lewis, Louise Centerville, la. 

Link, Eunice Kirksville 

Lorcnz, Bessie Kirksville 

Luman, F. E Hitt 

Maddox, Jesse Ash 

Markland, R. V Armstrong 

Markey, Minnie Kirksville 

Marshall, Mrs. L. Mae Phila. 

Mayo, C. P Mt. Airy 

McClellan, Alonzo Lawn City 

McClure, W. F , . . . . Jamespnrt 

McHendry, 'Mabel Kirksville 

Mclntyre, D. F Kirksville 

Mclntyre, J. R Kirksville 

McMichael, J. D .....Kirksville 

McMichael, Lula Kirksville 

Meara, Jno Glenwood 

Meredith, A. L Knox City 

Millay, Ada Kirksville 

Miller, Cora Brashrar 

Miller, J. A Kirksville 

Minton, D. H. Fortescue 

Minton, Robt Fortescue 

Minton, W. H Fortescue 

Mitchell, Arthur Kirksville 

Murdy, Newt Moulton, la. 

Nance, F. B , Civil Bend 

Nichols, Myrtle Burlington June. 

Nichols, Cassie Kirksville 

Nichols, Oleta ....Fulton 

Novinger, Blanche Danforth 

Ogle, C. E 31ngham, la. 

Owenby, Emma ., Kirksville 

Patterson, A. M Hurdland 

Pf lager, Clara Bosworth 

Phillips, A. L Green City 

Poehlraan, G. C Macon 

Poe, S. L College Mound 

Porter, Laura W Kirksville 



KIJtKSVILLE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



68 



SOPHOMORES. 

Powell, Ollte Klrksvllle 

Powell, Tilden Purdia 

Pratt, W. W Gait 

Ritcher, Golden Kirksville 

Riley, G. W Madison 

Ringo, Eugenia Kirksville 

Roberts, L. D Kirksville 

Rogers, Warren Easton 

Romjue, M. A Love Lake 

Roush, Nellie Maysville 

Royer, J. E. Jr Holliday 

Sandry, W. J Danforth 

Sansberry, C. W Thompson 

Scott, Jno. A Evansville 

Sears, Mayme Kirksville 

See, S. C a Tulip 

Sidener, Anna L Maud 

Sirains, Minnie B Saling 

Sipple, E. M Bucklin 

Smith, Anna Unionville 



80PHOMORES. 

Smoot, Mattie Downing 

Suedeker, Chas Kirksville 

Snyder, H. T Armstrong 

Sparks, Thos. E Holliday 

Speer, Olive Gorin 

Sprouse, Nathan Roads 

Stacy, W. O Queen r.ity 

Stewart, J. E Unionville 

Sweet, E. B Kirksville 

Sykes, Lottie LaBclle 

Toalson, Cynthia Sturgeon 

Trick, Vera ..Chicago, 111. 

Walters, H. L Stahl 

Wescott, L. R Rutledgo 

Wilkes, Eunice Kirksville 

Wilson, O. J Hopkins 

Wilson, Stella La Plata 

Woods, Florence Enterprise 

Wright, W. B Milan 

Young, Bertha Downing 



FRESHMEN. 

Alexander, C. F Kirksville 

Alexander, Mona. .Duncan's Bridge 

Alexander, Maude Kirksville 

Anderson, Minnie La Belle 

Archer, Mary Graysvllle 

Ashworth, Wm. Downing 

Ayers, C. L Alanta 

Bachman. Clyde Kirksville 

Barker, J. W Welch 

Barnes, M. H Tulip 

Barnes, P. J.... Kirksville 

Baxter, Olive Palmyra 

Belshe, Claude Trenton 

Beucler, Grace Revere 

Beucler, Jno Revere 

Billington, Eva, Wilmathville 

Bledsoe, Williard. Queen City 

Bodle, J. H Adair 

Bogle, Leona Coatesvllle 

Boring, Carrie Locust Hill 

Boring, Mollie Locust Hill 

Boyd, C. L La Plata 

Boyer, Mary Festua 

Boyes, Laura L Auxvasse 

Bram, Esther Allendale 

Brashear, Everette , Kirksville 

Brogan, Lucy Jacksonville 

Browning, Anna Unity 

Browning, M. P Unity 

Brown, W. I Baring 

Buck, Chas. L Lacrosse 

Buck, Etheyl St. John 

Bulkley, C. H Walnut 

Bulkley, Stella Walnut 

Bundy, Daisy Millard 

Burns, Hallie R Kirksville 

Calvert, A. K. S Ashton 

Calvert, O. N , Ashton 

Campbell, Eva ...Winigan 

Carpenter, A. M.,...."..... Amity 
Carothers, E. D ,. Kirksville 



FRESHMEN. 

Caskey, Nellie Kfrr^yllle 

Cavett, Wm Lowry Uity 

Chambers, Ida Gleuwo. 

Chappell, O. II Sidney, la. 

Clapper, F. F Stoutsville 

Clardy, Finis Ethel 

Clayton, A. L Lowndes 

Clements, J. C Glbbs 

Cole, Minnie Bullion 

Collier, May Lemonvllle 

Collins, Julia V Trenton 

Conner, Ellor Kirksville 

Cook, M. E..... Novinger 

Cornmesser, B. L Pennville 

Cover, Violet Kirksville 

Cox, OUie Cox 

Crawford, A. C Millard 

Crawford, Baxter Millard 

Crow, Martin Kirksville 

Crump, Florence Castle 

Daniel, Thos Maud 

Davis, Elma Green City 

Davisson, Callie Millard 

Day, Millard Bullion 

Deveney, Anna Edlna 

DeWitt, Eunice Reger 

DeWitt, Mary Regor 

Dorian, P. G Edlna 

Doze, Floy Green Castle 

Drummond, E. B.y: Stahl 

• Dunbar, Nellie Hartford 

Dye, Dott Seney 

Earhart, Willie . A Kirksville 

Eaton, Maggie Shelblna 

Eddy, Minine Kirksville 

Edwards, Jessie Kirksville 

Eitel, Lena Kirksville 

Ellison, J. H Fablus 

Englehart, F. A Brashear 

Evans, Anne Kirksville 

Evans, C. C Trenton 




«. 

fibers/ Su'sfr^-^&Kfe v St Patri >k < 
vrabrfnger; Mrs; .8. ' ,r# Kahoka 

* FarmeriyThoman; Vl; t . . . Powersvl lie 
,,'Farnsw6rttr/ Wit *T«v- • .Madlsonville 

4 Fl8h,> A. • V. ., .Klrksvtlle 

5 Fish; W; B.. . .... , . . .Kirksville 

Wisher, John \ . . ;'N . 7. Hurdland 

, Flanagan, ** ....«*...„.*, Lula 

btFlesher, Wm. J -.. JuJson 

^ Fountain, Maud : Sallng 

Forquer, Vesta Kirksville 
r.i Fry, Leonard ...Paradi-e 

Gtlllspie, J. V Adair 

Golden, Ole .Hurdland 

"". Gordon, Coral ...Frankford 

Gordon, Pearl — ....... .Frankford 

I Greenley, Maude Hedge City 

'; Gregg, Emma Kirksville 

•Griffin, Finis Kirksville 

Griffin, O. B . . . . : Atlanta 

' Grubb, E. A ......Kirksville 

Gujinells, Sarah_ La Plata 

. Haddock, T. J. Lowndes 

,. Haller, Emmor KirksvfTle 

Harding, Festus Allendale 

: Harainger, T. S Sorrell 

jf ^.trdy, Mae. Novelty 

Harr.F. D Anson 

: Harr, Jennie Auson 

1 Harris, E. A ; Delpha 

I Hassank, Ara . Kirksville 

1 Hauser, J. T. Kirksville 

Heaton, O. E ..Green City 

I Hickey, Katie Adair 

Hickman, C. H ,.. Sibley's Point 

Hickman, Lillie Sibley's Point 

Hill, H. B Green City 

Hogan, Mabel Kirksville 

Holland, W. K Sedalia 

t Holloway, Walter ....... ;Kirksville 

Holman, Mlnine Nefy 

: Holt, Claude F Guthrie 

' Hopewell, Claud .....Kirksville 

, Howard, Maggie Lucerne 

Howard, Nannie Lucerne 

; . Howerton, W. H...'. Hurdland 

Huffman, Mamie :. .Kirksville * 

• Hughs, C. M Sibley's Point 

Humphreys, J. C ...Humphreys 

Humphreys, Pauline ^Humphreys 

Hutton, Nell ...Woodville 

Irwin, S. H. ...Green City : 
Jackson, Courtney ....... Huntsville 

Jaynes, Norman ...... Osgood 

Jewell, Cora May.,. Howland 

Jones, J. A. L , . . .Nelsonville 

Kellogg, Artie — Bullion 

Kendrick, Joe .-..La Belle 

. Kendrick, Wm ...La Belle 

v Kerr, Mrs. Nelson ,.Edgerton 

U King, H. J ....Revere 

Knapp, C. L Goldsbury & 

I Knapp, G. W Kirksvillo V 

Knappj. Margaret Sidney 

Knapp, Rose Kirksville 



FRE8IIMKN. 

Leslie. O. A ^er Ridge 

Levengood, Eta lwr Ridge 

Lile, Chas (Joldaborry 

' Liveaay, Alice Gruyvll e 

Loftis, Ada Kirksville 

Maaek, Fannie KlrkHvllle 

Maggart. C. H Milan 

Majors, Raymond Kirksvillo 

Marksbury, H Bmerton 

Markey, Hattle Kirksville 

Martin, C. L Cincinnati, la, 

Martin, Ella Kahoka 

Martin, Roxle .Unlonvllle 

Mathews, Evett Revere 

Mathews, Bertha Revere 

Mathis, Luke Trenton 

Matthew, D. W Pe^nnville 

• Mayhugh, Martha Rothvllle 

MeCabe, Florence Kirksville 

McClanahan, C. C Nlnd 

McCollum, W Leverton 

McCuue, Kelly Clark 

McCoy, Carrie Kirksville 

McUavitt, Mayme ! Elmer 

McGee, F. F Lucerne 

McGee, Ora Spencerburg 

McKenney, J. A Maywood 

McMillan, W. O Pure Air 

McNally, Miles Lewiston 

McReynolds, Chas La Plata 

Meara, Thos Glenwood 

Meals, Susie Renlck 

Miller, Lowa Kirksville 

Miller, Nellie A Avalon 

Miller, Phoebe Greentop 

Million, Viola Woodlawn 

Nixon, F. L Kirksville 

Morelock, Isabelle Stahl 

Morris, O. B Winlgan 

Motter, N. P Tepley 

Muldoon, Teresa Adair 

Newcomb, G. F La Plata 

Newcomb, Marion Kirksville 

Nicholas, Jas Millard 

Nisbet, Pollie N ..Bullion 

Novinger, Maude Novlnger 

Oberg, Grant .-...Osborne 

Omer, Lottie Kirksville. 

Overfelt, Geo. , Marion 

Passwater, Clay Bullion 

Passwater, Lena Bullion 

Pearson, Fred ; Eagleville 

Pitts, Fred ....Knox City 

Pope, Ruhama . ... — .'; Nefy 

Porter, Pearl Hurdland 

Powell, Bodie Punlin 

Powell, Ernest Punlin 

Posey, Norris Green City 

Probst, Genevieve Kirksville 

Purdin, Minnie Hurdland 

. Rahe, Anna' Bullion 

• Ratliff, F. H Sperry 

Ratliff, Herman ...Ethel 

Reedal, Geo Kirksville 

Reger, Maud Reger 



55 



FRESHMEN.' 



Roberts, C. A : . .Ktrksville 

Robertson>-Anna Plevna 

Rust, Kirksville 

Rust, CUo j Kirksville 

Rutherford, Earl Kirksville 

^J^yan, Gertie Kirksville 

- Ryther, Flora Maccn 

* Sandry, Bertha Danforth 

Sears, Clara .Kirksville 

Sees,- Retta Kirksville 

Self, Eugene La Plata 

Sebastian, May Granville 

Shain, Ed Kirksville 

Shelton, G. R Pollock 

Sherer, Emma, Chapel 

Sherer, LeeV'. Chapel 

Shumaker, Ora * Lindenville 

Smiley, L. E Santa Pe 

Smoot, Anna Hazelville 

Spangler, -Homer Bullion 

Starr, Lee N Kirksville 

Stephen, Fearis Middle Grove 

Stephenson, D. I Kirksville 

Stewart, Delia Nofy 

Stokes, Emma Guthrie 

Stone, Hetta Hitt 

Strock, Airy .;. Brashear 

Strah, C. E .....Anson 

Strah, J. E ....Anson 

Swanson, A Greentop 

Swanson, Chas .Greentop 



FRE8HMKN. 

Swett, Everette Kirksville 

Switzer, Elder Snowilon 

Tallman, Chas Winlgan 

Terry, Irene Greentop 

Terry, R. E Green City 

Thompson, E. ' E Bullion 

Thompson, Wallace Hurdland 

Throckmorton, Lillle La belle 

Underwood, E. H Bachelor 

Vanlaningham, i-iula. . .Green Castle 

Van Pelt, Geo Love Lake 

Vaughn, C. E Kirksville 

Wade, Lewis Kahoka 

Wade, Ophelia Kahoka 

Walters, Maude Green Castle 

Whiteside, Eva Ayex 

Whitesides, Viola Paris 

Whittom, Jas Downing 

Williams, N. O Sp rry 

Willoughby, Effle Kirksville 

Wilson, Hettie Utica 

Wingerter, Clara Bor.ing 

Wingerter, Minerva Boring 

Wolf, C. A v Nlnd 

Wolf, Caroline Nind 

Wood, Mary Levick's Mill 

Woodruff, H. A Omaha 

Young, Clara Greentop 

Young, H. B Greentop 

Young, S. M Argyle